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Stone County Enterprise
Wiggins , Mississippi
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June 4, 2003     Stone County Enterprise
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June 4, 2003
 

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Page 12 Stone County Enterprise Wednesday, JUNE 4, 2003 ww Cathy Bushey, Charlie Saltsgiver, and Peggy Haston, congratu- late newly installed State MHV President Jean Colwart. Colwart Elected MS MHV President At the recent State Mississippi Homemaker Volunteers, Inc., meeting in Starkville, Jean Colwart, Wiggins, was installed as President of the statewide organization. Colwart will serve a two year term beginning in January, 2004. Colwart has served as State Treasurer and President-elect. Also attending the state meeting were Peggy Haston, who served as State Cultural Arts Chair. Charlie Saltsgiver, State Young Homemakers Chair, and Cathy Bushey, Special Community Issues committee member. Saltsgiver represented Stone County as the voting delegate at the meeting. The group was accompanied by Dr. Judith Breland, County Extension Director. The Phone Store &amp; More Get a FRE Cell Phone with 2 activations! located inside White's Pharmacy 303 E. Pine Ave.Wiggins, MS 928-3577 Relay for Life scheduled for this American Cancer Society's Stone County Relay for Life is scheduled for Friday June 6th. Events will begin at 7:00 p.m at MGCCC at A. L. May S[adium, Perkinston Campus. Luminaries Inspire reflections of hope and remembrance Whether it's a mother, neigh- bor, brother, co-worker, daugh- ter or friend, most of us know someone who has been touched by cancer. The American Cancer Society's Relay for Life in Stone County is an opportunity to rec- ognize our loved ones and friends who have fought this dis- ease and pay tribute to those who have lost the battle. After sundown at the Stone County Relay for Life on June 6, luminaries decorated with the names of those who have battled cancer are lit and left glowing throughout the night to remind everyone of the incredible importance of their contribu- tions. This ceremony of light symbolizes the hope and ,cpurage with which we all con- tinto fight for a cure. Luminaries can be purchased for a minimum donation of $10 before the event by calling Darlene Bond at 928-3245. Purchases can also be made at the event. Looking for something to do Friday, June 6? How about coming to the Relay for Life....there should be some- thing for everyone there Who Can Come: Anyone Who Feels Cancer is a Disease Worth Fighting Agains.t When: Friday, June 6, 2003 Saturday morning Where: A.L. May Memorial Stadium, MS Gulf Coast Community College, Perkinston Campus Schedule of Events: Team Registration is at 6:00 p.m. Survivor Registration is at 6:30 p.m. Survivor Celebration Lap/Opening Ceremonies is at 7:00 p.m. Dean Behon will serve as MC for Relay for Life event Opening prayer wilt be led by Bro. Tim Monroe Patriotic moment including colors presented, pledge & National Anthem sung. Survivors wilt be honored & presented with t-shirts & medals Survivors will make the first lap while listening to the song "Walking on Sunshine" Luminary" Ceremony is at 9:00 p.m. The Survivor's tent will be set up with cake, coffee and cold drinks. There will be a D.J. entertain- ing all night and several live groups and individuals provid- ing musical entertainment. Teams will be selling many different kinds q ing BBQ & plates, fries, chili sandwiches, funnel cakes, items, soft fee There fofa silent your ding") early Luminary A dunking able. Activities pate in include: Womanless Midnight Party, of War, Scavanger Football The Kid able for activities Have a blast this summer at Stennis HANCOCK COUNTY, Miss. - This summer, do something fun, educational and entertain- ing - that won't break the fami- ly's budget. Visit StenniSphere, Stennis Space Center's award- winning visitor center in Hancock County, where you and your family can "go aboard" the International Space Station or be transported to Mars! You'll find these adventures and more at Stennis, America's largest rocket test complex and discover why all astronauts travel into space on engines tested at Stennis Space Center. The visitor center is open daily and free of charge. A world of space adventure is featured in 14,000 square feet of interactive exhibits. Visitors can try their hand at piloting the Space Shuttle in a realistic cockpit sim- ulator: walk through a mock-up of the International Space Station to see how astronauts live and work; sit at the controls of a Space Shuttle Main Engine test in the Test Control Center exhibit; take a walk under the sea; and more. Outdoor exhibits include real rocket engines - including F-1 and J-2 engines that powered the Saturn V, the rocket that took Americans to the Moon - a Space Shuttle Main Engine and solid rocket booster: a scale model of the Saturn V Moon rocket: a 68-foot Jupiter C rock- et; a Learjet used in NASA's remote sensing applications: a full-scale NOMAD data buoy: a realistic Mars habitat; a covered pavilion: and picnic area. Added attractions include a 1960s-style diner, the RocKeTeria, a motion simulator ride ($4 for children ages 14 and under: $5 for adults) and the Space Odyssey Gift Shop, with out-of-this-world souvenirs and gifts. StenniSphere inspires visitors to reach beyond the stars by teaching them about NASA. Stennis Space Center and space exploration's rich history and exciting future. Visitors begin their journey at the Launch Pad at the Hancock County Welcome Center. Lift Exit 2. From there, they register, receive special visitors' badges to wear during their visit, and ride a StenniSphere, Stennis SpaCe way. Buses the Launch intervals all stay as long StenniSphere a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturda Sunday. It is holidays. call (228) 237-1821 ( Mississippi or www.s t o <http lie/visitors> Stone County Hospital It's that time again... HURRICANE SEASON!!! Government forecasters pre- dicted a busier-than- normal Atlantic hurricane season Monday: Six to nine hurri- canes overall, including two to four major storms packing winds of at least 111 mph. Higher-than-normal ocean temperatures and other factors should make conditions ripe for hurricanes this year, said James Mahoney, deputy administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Forecasters also said there is a 70 percent chance that La Niha will develop this summer. The weather phenomenon of lower-than-normal Pacific Ocean temperatures near the equator typically leads to more hurricane activity. Overall, 11 to 15 tropical storms are expected to develop during the season that runs from June 1 to November 30; the historical average is 10 tropical storms and six hurricanes. Last year, there were 12 tropical storms and four hurricanes. Hurricane forecaster William Gray updated his 2003 prediction last month to say there would be eight hurricanes, three of them severe. The Weather Research Center predicts six hurricanes this year. The storm names for the year are Ana, Bill, Claudette, Danny, Erika, Fabian, Grace, Henri, Isabel, Juan, Kate, Larry, Mindy, Nicholas, Odette, Peter, Rose, Sam, Teresa, Victor and Wanda. This important message has been brought to you by the staff of The Stone Count3' Family Medical Clinic and Stone Coun D, Hospital, Inc. Arthritis Aware Are you one of the 45 million people suffering from the num- ber one cause of disability in the U.S.? Arthritis is a continually growing health problem across the U.S. and it causes more peo- ple to suffer than back pain, heart or lung conditions, dia- betes or cancer. A recent study by the Center for Disease Control states that the number of Americans suffer- ing from arthritis is likely to increase to 60 million by 2020. The Arthritis Foundation reports that the disease is responsible for 427 million days of restricted activity, 156 million days in bed and 45 million days lost at work. "It is important to recognize the symptoms of arthritis," said Drew Huffman, D.O., a Rheumatologist with Hattiesburg Clinic. "Also the diagnosis should be accurate and specific to help the patient bene- fit from proper treatment." Symptoms of arthritis include swelling, pain and stiffness around the joints. These symp- toms usually cause sufferers to become less active as a result. "If arthritis is suspect- ed it is important to see a doctor early for an accurate diagnosis," said Dr. Huffman. "There are over 100 different forms of arthritis." said Dr. Huffman. "Identifying the type of arthritis is essential." The most prevalent form, affecting 50 percent of arthritis sufferers, is osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is a result of carti- lage in the joints wearing down, which causes the bones in the joints to rub together. This degenerative form is most com- mon in people over the age of 65. Rheumatoid arthritis is another form of arthritis. It is an autoim- mune disease that affects 2.5 million Americans. The immune system begins to act against the body and immune cells attack the cartilage and bone. Other common forms of arthri- tis include gout and lupus. Children and teens can also have arthritis. The most common form of arthritis in children and teens arthritis is juvenile rheumatoid arthritis ORAL The main symptoms of JRA are joint inflammation, joint contracture (stiff, bent joint), joint damage and/or alteration or change in growth. The symptoms can change in each different case as well as from day to day. $1 Juvenile From s SQUARE MANUFACTURED TO DESIRED LENGTHS ROLL UP & Sl.llk DOOR SYSTEMS CUSTOM DESIGNED TRIM * ACCESSORIES STEEL PURl.INS INSULATION Goldin Metals, Inc. 1-800-777-6216 spondyloarthropathy is another form found in children and teens, which affects the spine and the tendons. Studies done by the Center for Disease Control concluded that age and gender are two charac- teristics that affect the sufferers of arthritis. More women are affected women over an increased arthritis. In mately million are affected by' "Arthritis has a variety of ications toms," treatment use help matory can decrea-- ications *NSAIDs such as Alleve *COX-2 CelebreX, Mobic *Disease such Enbrel and For more call ice Clinic at Here'S  rile 37 is its ' Chiropractors are physicians trained to help relieve migraine headaches. Over 40 million people visit chiropractors each year to get help. Don't delay, get help for yourself today. CHIROPRACTORS... We Can Help SAUCIER CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC 23506-B Church .,nue MS Page 12 Stone County Enterprise Wednesday, JUNE 4, 2003 ww Cathy Bushey, Charlie Saltsgiver, and Peggy Haston, congratu- late newly installed State MHV President Jean Colwart. Colwart Elected MS MHV President At the recent State Mississippi Homemaker Volunteers, Inc., meeting in Starkville, Jean Colwart, Wiggins, was installed as President of the statewide organization. Colwart will serve a two year term beginning in January, 2004. Colwart has served as State Treasurer and President-elect. Also attending the state meeting were Peggy Haston, who served as State Cultural Arts Chair. Charlie Saltsgiver, State Young Homemakers Chair, and Cathy Bushey, Special Community Issues committee member. Saltsgiver represented Stone County as the voting delegate at the meeting. The group was accompanied by Dr. Judith Breland, County Extension Director. The Phone Store & More Get a FRE Cell Phone with 2 activations! located inside White's Pharmacy 303 E. Pine Ave.Wiggins, MS 928-3577 Relay for Life scheduled for this American Cancer Society's Stone County Relay for Life is scheduled for Friday June 6th. Events will begin at 7:00 p.m at MGCCC at A. L. May S[adium, Perkinston Campus. Luminaries Inspire reflections of hope and remembrance Whether it's a mother, neigh- bor, brother, co-worker, daugh- ter or friend, most of us know someone who has been touched by cancer. The American Cancer Society's Relay for Life in Stone County is an opportunity to rec- ognize our loved ones and friends who have fought this dis- ease and pay tribute to those who have lost the battle. After sundown at the Stone County Relay for Life on June 6, luminaries decorated with the names of those who have battled cancer are lit and left glowing throughout the night to remind everyone of the incredible importance of their contribu- tions. This ceremony of light symbolizes the hope and ,cpurage with which we all con- tinto fight for a cure. Luminaries can be purchased for a minimum donation of $10 before the event by calling Darlene Bond at 928-3245. Purchases can also be made at the event. Looking for something to do Friday, June 6? How about coming to the Relay for Life....there should be some- thing for everyone there Who Can Come: Anyone Who Feels Cancer is a Disease Worth Fighting Agains.t When: Friday, June 6, 2003 Saturday morning Where: A.L. May Memorial Stadium, MS Gulf Coast Community College, Perkinston Campus Schedule of Events: Team Registration is at 6:00 p.m. Survivor Registration is at 6:30 p.m. Survivor Celebration Lap/Opening Ceremonies is at 7:00 p.m. Dean Behon will serve as MC for Relay for Life event Opening prayer wilt be led by Bro. Tim Monroe Patriotic moment including colors presented, pledge & National Anthem sung. Survivors wilt be honored & presented with t-shirts & medals Survivors will make the first lap while listening to the song "Walking on Sunshine" Luminary" Ceremony is at 9:00 p.m. The Survivor's tent will be set up with cake, coffee and cold drinks. There will be a D.J. entertain- ing all night and several live groups and individuals provid- ing musical entertainment. Teams will be selling many different kinds q ing BBQ & plates, fries, chili sandwiches, funnel cakes, items, soft fee There fofa silent your ding") early Luminary A dunking able. Activities pate in include: Womanless Midnight Party, of War, Scavanger Football The Kid able for activities Have a blast this summer at Stennis HANCOCK COUNTY, Miss. - This summer, do something fun, educational and entertain- ing - that won't break the fami- ly's budget. Visit StenniSphere, Stennis Space Center's award- winning visitor center in Hancock County, where you and your family can "go aboard" the International Space Station or be transported to Mars! You'll find these adventures and more at Stennis, America's largest rocket test complex and discover why all astronauts travel into space on engines tested at Stennis Space Center. The visitor center is open daily and free of charge. A world of space adventure is featured in 14,000 square feet of interactive exhibits. Visitors can try their hand at piloting the Space Shuttle in a realistic cockpit sim- ulator: walk through a mock-up of the International Space Station to see how astronauts live and work; sit at the controls of a Space Shuttle Main Engine test in the Test Control Center exhibit; take a walk under the sea; and more. Outdoor exhibits include real rocket engines - including F-1 and J-2 engines that powered the Saturn V, the rocket that took Americans to the Moon - a Space Shuttle Main Engine and solid rocket booster: a scale model of the Saturn V Moon rocket: a 68-foot Jupiter C rock- et; a Learjet used in NASA's remote sensing applications: a full-scale NOMAD data buoy: a realistic Mars habitat; a covered pavilion: and picnic area. Added attractions include a 1960s-style diner, the RocKeTeria, a motion simulator ride ($4 for children ages 14 and under: $5 for adults) and the Space Odyssey Gift Shop, with out-of-this-world souvenirs and gifts. StenniSphere inspires visitors to reach beyond the stars by teaching them about NASA. Stennis Space Center and space exploration's rich history and exciting future. Visitors begin their journey at the Launch Pad at the Hancock County Welcome Center. Lift Exit 2. From there, they register, receive special visitors' badges to wear during their visit, and ride a StenniSphere, Stennis SpaCe way. Buses the Launch intervals all stay as long StenniSphere a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturda Sunday. It is holidays. call (228) 237-1821 ( Mississippi or www.s t o <http lie/visitors> Stone County Hospital It's that time again... HURRICANE SEASON!!! Government forecasters pre- dicted a busier-than- normal Atlantic hurricane season Monday: Six to nine hurri- canes overall, including two to four major storms packing winds of at least 111 mph. Higher-than-normal ocean temperatures and other factors should make conditions ripe for hurricanes this year, said James Mahoney, deputy administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Forecasters also said there is a 70 percent chance that La Niha will develop this summer. The weather phenomenon of lower-than-normal Pacific Ocean temperatures near the equator typically leads to more hurricane activity. Overall, 11 to 15 tropical storms are expected to develop during the season that runs from June 1 to November 30; the historical average is 10 tropical storms and six hurricanes. Last year, there were 12 tropical storms and four hurricanes. Hurricane forecaster William Gray updated his 2003 prediction last month to say there would be eight hurricanes, three of them severe. The Weather Research Center predicts six hurricanes this year. The storm names for the year are Ana, Bill, Claudette, Danny, Erika, Fabian, Grace, Henri, Isabel, Juan, Kate, Larry, Mindy, Nicholas, Odette, Peter, Rose, Sam, Teresa, Victor and Wanda. This important message has been brought to you by the staff of The Stone Count3' Family Medical Clinic and Stone Coun D, Hospital, Inc. Arthritis Aware Are you one of the 45 million people suffering from the num- ber one cause of disability in the U.S.? Arthritis is a continually growing health problem across the U.S. and it causes more peo- ple to suffer than back pain, heart or lung conditions, dia- betes or cancer. A recent study by the Center for Disease Control states that the number of Americans suffer- ing from arthritis is likely to increase to 60 million by 2020. The Arthritis Foundation reports that the disease is responsible for 427 million days of restricted activity, 156 million days in bed and 45 million days lost at work. "It is important to recognize the symptoms of arthritis," said Drew Huffman, D.O., a Rheumatologist with Hattiesburg Clinic. "Also the diagnosis should be accurate and specific to help the patient bene- fit from proper treatment." Symptoms of arthritis include swelling, pain and stiffness around the joints. These symp- toms usually cause sufferers to become less active as a result. "If arthritis is suspect- ed it is important to see a doctor early for an accurate diagnosis," said Dr. Huffman. "There are over 100 different forms of arthritis." said Dr. Huffman. "Identifying the type of arthritis is essential." The most prevalent form, affecting 50 percent of arthritis sufferers, is osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is a result of carti- lage in the joints wearing down, which causes the bones in the joints to rub together. This degenerative form is most com- mon in people over the age of 65. Rheumatoid arthritis is another form of arthritis. It is an autoim- mune disease that affects 2.5 million Americans. The immune system begins to act against the body and immune cells attack the cartilage and bone. Other common forms of arthri- tis include gout and lupus. Children and teens can also have arthritis. The most common form of arthritis in children and teens arthritis is juvenile rheumatoid arthritis ORAL The main symptoms of JRA are joint inflammation, joint contracture (stiff, bent joint), joint damage and/or alteration or change in growth. The symptoms can change in each different case as well as from day to day. $1 Juvenile From s SQUARE MANUFACTURED TO DESIRED LENGTHS ROLL UP & Sl.llk DOOR SYSTEMS CUSTOM DESIGNED TRIM * ACCESSORIES STEEL PURl.INS INSULATION Goldin Metals, Inc. 1-800-777-6216 spondyloarthropathy is another form found in children and teens, which affects the spine and the tendons. Studies done by the Center for Disease Control concluded that age and gender are two charac- teristics that affect the sufferers of arthritis. More women are affected women over an increased arthritis. In mately million are affected by' "Arthritis has a variety of ications toms," treatment use help matory can decrea-- ications *NSAIDs such as Alleve *COX-2 CelebreX, Mobic *Disease such Enbrel and For more call ice Clinic at Here'S  rile 37 is its ' Chiropractors are physicians trained to help relieve migraine headaches. Over 40 million people visit chiropractors each year to get help. Don't delay, get help for yourself today. CHIROPRACTORS... We Can Help SAUCIER CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC 23506-B Church .,nue MS