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Stone County Enterprise
Wiggins , Mississippi
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June 4, 2003     Stone County Enterprise
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June 4, 2003
 

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Page 6 Stone County Enterprise Wednesday, JUNE 4, 2003 D IZ i The beauty of Stone County You know me as Veteran's ers and many other people from way to approach and to enhance --. sculptures and people of many Comer columnist in which l tea- different walks of life that bring this prdgram, o'thcr talents. There are also tured the many men and women beauty and culture to our A lot of people do not "know man}laeople in our communities who fought in World War lI and County. We, as the people of that we have that have arts many other wars to help pre- this County need to bring this artists who are and other tal- serve the freedoms and beauties group of people into the main members of gal- ents that need to of this country. Stone County is stream of our growing County. leries all over, be recognized one of the most beautiful coun- The Chamber of Commerce we have young CI: and can be done ties in this state and its people and the EDP are beginning a people who are through the are some of the most talented special effort to promote and teaching dance efforts of this and artistic groups we have in enhance this wonderful group of to promote group of peo- this country, people in Stone County. They grace and poise pie. With the We have some of the most tal- had a meeting to see w.hat could in our younger help of this ented people in the arts, and be done in this effort. From that people. Among community we their talents are not well-known meeting, a group of people got the group of can bring for- in our County. We have lawyer's together and set up a committee people in our wonderful County ward the many talents of all the wives, waitresses, schoolteach- to see what would be the best there are artists, wood carvers, future generations to come and preserve all of beauties this honored by tl County has to offer, beauties these When I was riting the tray. Veteran's Comer, many people I hope with did not know that their neigh- this County bors and friends helped preserve people will the many freedoms we enjoy help promote today. The same thing applies talents God now in our community we have County is neighbors who are songwriters, through artists and have many other tal- promote ents that are hidden because they the of feel like many people, they do in Stone not have all letters required to very much tory come forward. But the talents this matter and l they have are wonderful gifts to write more from God and we are always wonderful What Mississippians should know about mosquito breeding Mississippians may not be the only ones lying around swim- ming pools this summer. According to State Department of Health Medical Entomologist Dr. Jerome Goddard, swimming pools that go unkept can serve as a breeding ground for the state's most unwelcome summer pest - the mosquito. Goddard said, "If swimming pools and other potential mos- quito breeding grounds are well- maintained, then some home- owners will eliminate a place for the biting pests to reproduce."' Health experts suggest that homeowners keep their pools -Empty plastic wading pools at puddles, ditches, or swampy emptied or covered during off- least once a week and store places around the home season and full and well-main- indoors when not in use ,Place tight covers over cis- tained during in-season. -Change the water in bird baths terns, cesspools, septic tanks, Common breeding sites for and plant pots or drip trays at fire barrels, rain barrels, and mosquitoes wiry from artificial least once each week tubs where water is stored containers to storm sewers, ,Store boats covered or upside ,Keep the margins of small catch basins, and poorly drained down, or remove rainwater ponds clear of vegetation street gutters or ditches, weekly ,Keep rain gutters unclogged Homeowners can contribute to ,Level the ground around the and flat roofs dr) mosquito control by simply fol- home, so water can run off and Mississippians can also reduce lowing these steps: not collect in low spots, mosquito contact by avoiding Destroy or dispose of tin cans, ,Remove tree stumps that may unnecessary outdoor activity old tires, and artificial water hold water  during evening and night time containers ,Stock ornamental ponds with hours, when mosquitoes are Irrigate lawns and gardens top-feeding minnows most active. If outdoors, one carefully, without excess ,Drain or fill stagnant pools, should wear protective clothing 2002 Drinking Water Quality Report Sunflower Utility Association, Inc. (PWS ID# 0660022) Is my water safe? Last year, as in years past, your tap water met all U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Mississippi State Department of Health drinking water standards. We vigilantly safeguard our water supply and once again we are proud to report that our system has not violated a maximum con- taminant level or any other water quality standard. This report is a snapshot of last year's water quality. Included are details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to standards set by regulatory agencies. We are committed to providing you with information because informed customers are our best allies. Do I need to take special precautions? Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as per- sons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune System disor- ders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from thiir health care providers. EPNCenters for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Water Drinking Hotline (800-426-4791). Where does my water come from? Our water comesfrom#r located onWire Road. This well draws water from the Catahoula Aquifer. Source water assessment and its availability: Our source water assessment is available and may be viewed at the office of the system. Why are there contaminants in my drinking water? Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of con- taminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). How can I get involved? Our association conducts its annual membership meeting on the first Tuesday of March each year at 6:00 p.m. at the Well Site. This is a very important meeting in which all customers are encouraged to attend. Other information: You may want additional information about your drinking water. You may contact our certified waterworks operator or you may prefer to log on to the tnternet and obtain specific information about your system and its compliance history at the following address: http://www.msdh.state.us/watersup- ply/index.htm Information including current and past boil water notices, compliance and reporting violations, and other information pertaining to your water supply including "Why, When, and How to Boil Your Drinking Water" and "Flooding and Safe Drinking Water" may be obtained. Water Quality Data Table The table below lists all of the drinking water contaminants that we detected during the calendar year of this report. The presence of contaminants in the water does not 'necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from test- ing clone in the calendar year of the report. The EPA or the State requires us to monitor for certain contaminants tess than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Important Drinking Water Definitions: MCLG: Maximum Contaminant Level Goat: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. MCL: Maximum Contaminant Level: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. AL: Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must fol- low. Copper (ppm) 1.3 1.3 0.365 0 No Lead (ppb) 0 15 1 0 No Units Description: NA: Not applicable ND: Dot detected NR: Not reported MNR: Monitoring not required, but recommended. ppm: parts per million, or milligrams per liter (rag/I) ppb: parts per billion, or micrograms per liter (pg/I) Publish: 5/28/03 Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives; Corrasion of household plumbing systems Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits such as long pants, long-sleeved Department ofl shirts, and socks, www For more information on West the West Nile Nile virus, the public can log onto the Mississippi State Patches and from other days Q. How can I find out more stars, and other ! about antique quilts and their Presidential value, and how to recognize made, such as their various patterns? Sandra example O'Brien, Jewett. TX traits of A. Aside from keeping folks dents, as well warm, the charm of old quilts flag. U.S. have captured the hearts of col- American eagle' lectors who are wrapped up in others were their history, and the unfor- gettable stories they tell relating to their past, purpose, and patterns, quilts were Among the most sought after designed patterned examples are house patched quilts designed with a house, sent family school, church, or some other there were structure as a motif. Other quilt well as album motifs included baskets of trian- and stitched gular posies, pinwheel designs, Some quilts stars, stripes, squares, cubes, tri- tion to angles and circles. An unusual from .,,craps design on a quilt is a Calico Cup bles" as theY and Saucer pattern. Another called, kept charming pattern is Thousand patch" bagS. Pyramids, and still another, is bles" were the Double Monkey Wrench. dresses, Yet among the most sought and other quilts were those made bv the were Amish. Especially desirable, are A Amish crib and doll-size quilts with. which that often command sizable quilts in full sums. One is a lovely, hand descriptions, woven, plum and pewter color values, is crib quilt designed with faceless Identifying, Amish dolls made to stand out in Preserving relief. Bobble Aug, Old quilts were made from all Gerald Roy, types of cloth ranging from call- 222-page co to chintz to gingham to $27.95 muslin and other material. Books, EO. "Crazy quilts" had hit and miss KY 42002-3 patterns fashioned from irregu- 626-5420 lar-sized pieces of silk. velvet, if ou want brocade, moir6 and heavy ribbon stitched together (often in a ular books feather stitch design). Some start to crazy quilts were quite elaborate "Essential with fancy stitching, names, ini- Perfect tials, dates, and sometimes even Marrow figures or faces of famous per- page edition sons. One I saw was embellished color with the figure of John L. paid Sullivan. Others were stitched to commemorate the 1876 Iola. WI Centennial designed with (888) American flags, eagles, shields, DECORATOR Semi.Annual Sale Starts June 4 25% Off All In.Stock 40%-60% ' New Shipment from New York Just 1204 E. Pass Road, Gulfp0rt, MS * Pensacola. FL Page 6 Stone County Enterprise Wednesday, JUNE 4, 2003 D IZ i The beauty of Stone County You know me as Veteran's ers and many other people from way to approach and to enhance --. sculptures and people of many Comer columnist in which l tea- different walks of life that bring this prdgram, o'thcr talents. There are also tured the many men and women beauty and culture to our A lot of people do not "know man}laeople in our communities who fought in World War lI and County. We, as the people of that we have that have arts many other wars to help pre- this County need to bring this artists who are and other tal- serve the freedoms and beauties group of people into the main members of gal- ents that need to of this country. Stone County is stream of our growing County. leries all over, be recognized one of the most beautiful coun- The Chamber of Commerce we have young CI: and can be done ties in this state and its people and the EDP are beginning a people who are through the are some of the most talented special effort to promote and teaching dance efforts of this and artistic groups we have in enhance this wonderful group of to promote group of peo- this country, people in Stone County. They grace and poise pie. With the We have some of the most tal- had a meeting to see w.hat could in our younger help of this ented people in the arts, and be done in this effort. From that people. Among community we their talents are not well-known meeting, a group of people got the group of can bring for- in our County. We have lawyer's together and set up a committee people in our wonderful County ward the many talents of all the wives, waitresses, schoolteach- to see what would be the best there are artists, wood carvers, future generations to come and preserve all of beauties this honored by tl County has to offer, beauties these When I was riting the tray. Veteran's Comer, many people I hope with did not know that their neigh- this County bors and friends helped preserve people will the many freedoms we enjoy help promote today. The same thing applies talents God now in our community we have County is neighbors who are songwriters, through artists and have many other tal- promote ents that are hidden because they the of feel like many people, they do in Stone not have all letters required to very much tory come forward. But the talents this matter and l they have are wonderful gifts to write more from God and we are always wonderful What Mississippians should know about mosquito breeding Mississippians may not be the only ones lying around swim- ming pools this summer. According to State Department of Health Medical Entomologist Dr. Jerome Goddard, swimming pools that go unkept can serve as a breeding ground for the state's most unwelcome summer pest - the mosquito. Goddard said, "If swimming pools and other potential mos- quito breeding grounds are well- maintained, then some home- owners will eliminate a place for the biting pests to reproduce."' Health experts suggest that homeowners keep their pools -Empty plastic wading pools at puddles, ditches, or swampy emptied or covered during off- least once a week and store places around the home season and full and well-main- indoors when not in use ,Place tight covers over cis- tained during in-season. -Change the water in bird baths terns, cesspools, septic tanks, Common breeding sites for and plant pots or drip trays at fire barrels, rain barrels, and mosquitoes wiry from artificial least once each week tubs where water is stored containers to storm sewers, ,Store boats covered or upside ,Keep the margins of small catch basins, and poorly drained down, or remove rainwater ponds clear of vegetation street gutters or ditches, weekly ,Keep rain gutters unclogged Homeowners can contribute to ,Level the ground around the and flat roofs dr) mosquito control by simply fol- home, so water can run off and Mississippians can also reduce lowing these steps: not collect in low spots, mosquito contact by avoiding Destroy or dispose of tin cans, ,Remove tree stumps that may unnecessary outdoor activity old tires, and artificial water hold water  during evening and night time containers ,Stock ornamental ponds with hours, when mosquitoes are Irrigate lawns and gardens top-feeding minnows most active. If outdoors, one carefully, without excess ,Drain or fill stagnant pools, should wear protective clothing 2002 Drinking Water Quality Report Sunflower Utility Association, Inc. (PWS ID# 0660022) Is my water safe? Last year, as in years past, your tap water met all U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Mississippi State Department of Health drinking water standards. We vigilantly safeguard our water supply and once again we are proud to report that our system has not violated a maximum con- taminant level or any other water quality standard. This report is a snapshot of last year's water quality. Included are details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to standards set by regulatory agencies. We are committed to providing you with information because informed customers are our best allies. Do I need to take special precautions? Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as per- sons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune System disor- ders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from thiir health care providers. EPNCenters for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Water Drinking Hotline (800-426-4791). Where does my water come from? Our water comesfrom#r located onWire Road. This well draws water from the Catahoula Aquifer. Source water assessment and its availability: Our source water assessment is available and may be viewed at the office of the system. Why are there contaminants in my drinking water? Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of con- taminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). How can I get involved? Our association conducts its annual membership meeting on the first Tuesday of March each year at 6:00 p.m. at the Well Site. This is a very important meeting in which all customers are encouraged to attend. Other information: You may want additional information about your drinking water. You may contact our certified waterworks operator or you may prefer to log on to the tnternet and obtain specific information about your system and its compliance history at the following address: http://www.msdh.state.us/watersup- ply/index.htm Information including current and past boil water notices, compliance and reporting violations, and other information pertaining to your water supply including "Why, When, and How to Boil Your Drinking Water" and "Flooding and Safe Drinking Water" may be obtained. Water Quality Data Table The table below lists all of the drinking water contaminants that we detected during the calendar year of this report. The presence of contaminants in the water does not 'necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from test- ing clone in the calendar year of the report. The EPA or the State requires us to monitor for certain contaminants tess than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Important Drinking Water Definitions: MCLG: Maximum Contaminant Level Goat: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. MCL: Maximum Contaminant Level: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. AL: Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must fol- low. Copper (ppm) 1.3 1.3 0.365 0 No Lead (ppb) 0 15 1 0 No Units Description: NA: Not applicable ND: Dot detected NR: Not reported MNR: Monitoring not required, but recommended. ppm: parts per million, or milligrams per liter (rag/I) ppb: parts per billion, or micrograms per liter (pg/I) Publish: 5/28/03 Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives; Corrasion of household plumbing systems Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits such as long pants, long-sleeved Department ofl shirts, and socks, www For more information on West the West Nile Nile virus, the public can log onto the Mississippi State Patches and from other days Q. How can I find out more stars, and other ! about antique quilts and their Presidential value, and how to recognize made, such as their various patterns? Sandra example O'Brien, Jewett. TX traits of A. Aside from keeping folks dents, as well warm, the charm of old quilts flag. U.S. have captured the hearts of col- American eagle' lectors who are wrapped up in others were their history, and the unfor- gettable stories they tell relating to their past, purpose, and patterns, quilts were Among the most sought after designed patterned examples are house patched quilts designed with a house, sent family school, church, or some other there were structure as a motif. Other quilt well as album motifs included baskets of trian- and stitched gular posies, pinwheel designs, Some quilts stars, stripes, squares, cubes, tri- tion to angles and circles. An unusual from .,,craps design on a quilt is a Calico Cup bles" as theY and Saucer pattern. Another called, kept charming pattern is Thousand patch" bagS. Pyramids, and still another, is bles" were the Double Monkey Wrench. dresses, Yet among the most sought and other quilts were those made bv the were Amish. Especially desirable, are A Amish crib and doll-size quilts with. which that often command sizable quilts in full sums. One is a lovely, hand descriptions, woven, plum and pewter color values, is crib quilt designed with faceless Identifying, Amish dolls made to stand out in Preserving relief. Bobble Aug, Old quilts were made from all Gerald Roy, types of cloth ranging from call- 222-page co to chintz to gingham to $27.95 muslin and other material. Books, EO. "Crazy quilts" had hit and miss KY 42002-3 patterns fashioned from irregu- 626-5420 lar-sized pieces of silk. velvet, if ou want brocade, moir6 and heavy ribbon stitched together (often in a ular books feather stitch design). Some start to crazy quilts were quite elaborate "Essential with fancy stitching, names, ini- Perfect tials, dates, and sometimes even Marrow figures or faces of famous per- page edition sons. One I saw was embellished color with the figure of John L. paid Sullivan. Others were stitched to commemorate the 1876 Iola. WI Centennial designed with (888) American flags, eagles, shields, DECORATOR Semi.Annual Sale Starts June 4 25% Off All In.Stock 40%-60% ' New Shipment from New York Just 1204 E. Pass Road, Gulfp0rt, MS * Pensacola. FL