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Stone County Enterprise
Wiggins , Mississippi
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March 8, 1984     Stone County Enterprise
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March 8, 1984
 

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FLEHO BOOKBIJDINO ROUTE 1 BOX 42-^ QOITgAN, MS. 39355 CO,PANT 00;00one (gount!00 00nlerpri00;e "Gateway To The Beautiful Mississippi Gulf Coast" he 100th bit- of Henry Thomas was born on March ; the father of Mrs. ,RowelL , will be held In tbe Hall of the church March 11 at 2 p.m. relatives are in m Weidmg Semtm intensive two-day technology will March 15-16 at Coast Junior College's County campus at wRl be March 17 college in conJunctien will be from 1 L on March 15 on the cam- ,Pees are $30 for one day for two days for non- for one day or memO. for one day or $10 for pro bours will be from te 5 p.m. Mmh 15 and Additional laboratory for welding will be March 15. All on the  irornmtion call v Pratt 601-.2609, John at 601-935-13, or Phi; t at 601-?GS-S&77. Women's Cllb. regular montlffy of the Waen/s Club March 13 at 3 at the clubbouse. C. D. Rouse will lead Hostesses an Mrs Denson. are asked to b Cket O court clerks frnw state will meet at the Metrc Inn March 12-13 fm for the seminar in- appeals to circuit court Mississippi korenm field audit procedures, update, 1984 elec- locedures and stres will be from aJn, Monday, March will start at 9 a.m  and win on Tuesday, March ;II:15 a.m. Tree Lovers are a tree lover, don't Missmippi Seminar March 29 at the Extension Service, B Theater in is scheduled tc registration at City managers am beautificatior ; rare urged to attend. values or heine. To find ont e-t the semnmr and care for your trees, contact the Extension Ser- Daparmmnt at 5, Missmippi (601-335-3150), Urban Forester, v C, onm* Rohert E. Lee Jacks MS SB0" Msm Assoclatlm Marc, at the R.M. Lad- in Lisana. l. 1ter wtu be how to do the cle bark grae, and tte Star In a spec which hat an almUal even fm THUPDAY, MARCH 8, 1984 WIGGINS, MISSISSIPPI SINGLE COPY 15 CENTS (USPS s3oo) Three Mississippians take top offices MISSISSIPPFS COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE, Jim "Buck" Ross (center), presents plaques of recognition to newly-elected, top officers of national agricultural orgaulza- {ions, W.H. Houston HI, (left), chairman of The Cotton Foun- dation, and J.R. HollinBsworth, president of the national AgrlcuRm Aviation Association, at the "American Herige Program" Grower's Meeting in Greenv/lle. Ralph Weems, president of the American Soybean Association was Dot pre- sent to receive his plaque. L t. Col. Webb honored by Rotary Jay C. Webb, past president. and member of the Wiggins Rotary Club was named as a Paul Harris Fellow of Rotary tional in appraciat/on of his tansib and snm contr/lmfions to the Paul Har- ris FoandaUon of Rotary In- ternationaL Webb was presented with the Paul Harris certificate, medal and lapel pin by Rotary President J. Ed Mania in a ceremony on March 1 at the MGCJC cafeteria. This brings the number of Paul Harris Fellows with the Wiggins Rotary Club to eight. The other recipients are M.E. Cooper (deceased), John Dees, Ferris Butson, J. Ed Mania, Otho RowelI, Jimmy Gammage and Wayne McHemT. The Paul Harris Foundation is an international goodwill ef- fort funded by Rotarians on a volunterry basis to further education and friendship worldwide. It *involves ex- changing American groups and students with all free world countries, financing graduate studies and specialized educational grants and the -thermwe of better understanding and friendly relations between people of the world. Webb was bern and reared in Lmdsville, Ms., graduated from Lonme High Scol, and the University of Southern Mississippi. He spent 24 years in military, three years in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War H and 21 years in the U,S. Army und retired from the Army in June, 1979, with the rank of li col- onel. Webb participated in the vasion of Okinawa during Worm War H, was in the Korean conflict and serve two tours of duty in Vietnam. During his 24 years military caree be earned and was awarded military decorations including the Legion of Merit, Brome Star with an Oak Le Cluster, Army and Air Foro Commendation and th, Presidential Unit CRatlon, LL Col. Webb presently 5cads up the ROTC program at atom mgh Seboo He is married to the former Jeanelle Varnado of Wiggins and they have three children and four grandchildren. m Part of Amerlcs's real strength b tbe emftdeace tlmt we eaa aml will tske care of ourselves. Aid that's where U. S. 8av lm eeme in -- both' family and utlomal Umme LT. COL. JAY WEBB KAREN McQUIEN Four Perk secretaries named outstanding Four secretaries at Gulf Coast Junior College have been selected as an Out.stan- ding Young Woman of America for 1963. They are Karen McQueen of Saucier, and June Roberts, Sarah Mulvaney and Evelyn Strange, all of Gu. "The award recognizes the many young women who give their time, talents and unselfish service to enrich the quality of American life," said Margaret Arnold, chair- woman of the board of ad- visors of OYWA. "These women were selected from thousands of nominations sub- mired by respected business and civic leaders throughout the country," sheadded. McQneen, secretary to the vice president for instruc- tional affairs, is an honor graduate of Ocean Spring High School and MGCJC's Porkinston eamlms. She i president of t Mississippi Association of Educationa Secretaries. She is a member of Firs1 Baptist Church of McHenry and serves as organist and is Sunday School teacher. Mc- Queen and her husband W.A. Jr., am the parents of two children, Dale and Michelh. Her parents are Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Fulton of Saucier. Rober a graduate of Saint John High School and Perkinston campus, it secretary to the dean ot academic and general instruc- tion at the Jefferson Davis campus. Mulvaney, admissions secretary at Jefferson Davis, is a graduate of Biloxi High chool and an honor graduate of Jefferson Davis. Strange is secretary to the dean of business services at Jefferson Davis. She is a graduate of Harrison Central Military Mention SGT. CAMERON Tech. Sgt. Gary Cameron, son of Irene B. Cameron of Rural Route 4, Lucedale, has been decorated with the thini award of the Air Force COm- mendatio, Medal at Semba Air Base, West Germany. The Air Force Commenda- tion Medal is awarde0 t') tho. individuals who den.o, drate women High School where she rece/v- ed a Merit Award for scholastic achievement. I II illlllll For the record I III POLICE REPORT one arre DUI. Four arrests, speeding. Two arrests, false pretense. One arrest,  the peace. One arrest, burglary. Two arrests, grand tmmy. FIRE REPORT" March 3, grass fire, 5th and Stulin. SHERIFF REPORT One arrest, possession of stolen vehicle, speeding, reckless driving, aggravated assault, and resisting arrest. One arrest, possession of stolen property. One arrest, DUI, reckless driving, and suspended driver's license. One arrest, grand larceny. " formance of their duties on Three arrests, DUI. behalf of the Air Force. One arrest, buying and atoll- Cameron is an airfield ing stolon property. management supervisor with One arrest, contempt of the Mlst Combat Support Group. His wife, Marg/e, is the dauther of Lon M. Parker of Rural Route 2, Perkinston. cour Four arrests, public drunk. Three arrests, simple possession marijuana. Two arrests, felony sion of marijuana, concealad. weapon, recke dvg, Mississippi produces more than just cotton; Mississippi produces achievers. William Faulkner, Elvis Presley. Yet many, like novelist Eudora Welty and opera singer Leon- tyne Price, have names obscure to most. And certainly not all have faces that would turn heads in a crowd-Ralph Weerns, W.H. Houston, HI, J.R. Hollingsworth. But they're all notable Mississip- plans, and Weems, Houston and Hollingsworth, like others, are leaders in their fields. This trio of Mississippians are newly-elected, top officers of national agricultural organizations. Facing a full year in office, Weems is serv- ing as president of the American Soybean Associa- tion (ASA), Houston is acting as chairman of The Cotton Foundation, while Holl- ingsworth holds the position of president of the National Agricultural Aviation Associa- tion (NAAA). The ASA, a farmer- controlled organization work- Child abuse conference planned A one-day coherence on Child Abuse will be held on Tuesday, April 3 at the Col- iseum Ramada Inn in Jackson. The goal is to pro- vide a means by which par- ticipants can (I) encourage cmmnunity awareness of child abuse; (2) share information on innovative programs; and (3) learn from experienced and knowledgeable profes- sionals. Nine panel sessions and an all-day film theater are scheduled for the conference. Representatives from the medical, legal, and social ser- vices fields and from the business and private sector, including volunteers in com- munity service, social groups, PTA, etc., are invited to at- tend. A pre-regtstration fee of $12 is required which includes lunch and conference material& The deadline for registration is March 23. For more information con- tact the Mississippi Child AImse Corerence, 714 North State St., Jackson, Ms. 39201, phone 352-0175. Bell resumes leasing to disabled outstanding chieveme,t or, meritorious service in the per- Sou Contral Bell hes an- nounced that R is now offering a volume 1 handset and portable communications ter- minal for the hearing and/or pred customer. "We're pleased that we're once again able to offer these products to customers," ex- plalned Don Roberts, district manager, South Central Bell. Wlth tim divestiture of South Contral Bell from AT&T on January 1, lm4, the ownembip of equ/pmmt being leased by cushmm was transferred to AT&r. In order to meet the needs of disabled customers, the M1uiuippl Public Service Commm/on approved h Central Bell's request for per mission to once qjttn offer the equipment te now  on a leased bests. Ctmtomers interested in more infm-nmUon on these prodtz sheuld carl tim South Central Bell Customer He is a 1965 graduate of p0eseesion of schedule three ;Assistance Bureau at Leakesvflle High SchonL drngs, and poseesslon of beer. 1. ing to increase soybean pro- fits, has 26 affiliated state associations with about 24J}00 members. As a non-profit organization, The Cotton Foundation is responsible for research and education within the National Cotton Council of America. The Cotton Council's membership includes growers, ginners, warehousemen, seed crushers, merchants, cooperatives and manufac- turers. With 1,400 members, including operating com- panies, their pilots and allied industry, the NAAA coor- dinates and directs the efforts of the agricultural aviation in- dustry. Three officers of these na- tional organizations were honored at the "American Heritage Program" Grower's Meeting, sponsored by ICI Americas Inc. Jim "Buck" Ross, Mississippi's commis- sioner of agriculture, presented each leader with a plaque of recognition at the meeting held in Greenville, Miss. "Cotton and soybean growers from Mississippi gathered to honor these agricultural achievers and their success," says J.R. Huston, director of marketing at ICI Americas. Hudson, who addressed the evening meeting, says, "We at ICI were pleased to be able to sponsor',tl event for three Mississipplans. They are truly deserving of such recognition. "With extraordinarily similar backgrounds," Hnsdon adds, "these ac- complished individuals bring invaluable experience to their new positions." Each attended college in Mississippi, and to- day, living with 120 miles of each other, are all self- employed. Weems, a soybean grower, farms in the nor- thwest corner of the state in Tunica. As president of W.H. Houston & Sons, Inc., Houst has a large farming operation of cotton, rice and soybean. Further to the south in Shelby, the NAAA president, an agricultural aviator with 34 years of experience, also operates his own company, HoUingsworth Flying Service. Coupled with their business knowledge, each officer has a record of extensive involve- ment with their organization. After serving as president of the Delta Council in 1980,. Houston held the same posi- tion in 1982 at The Cotton Foundation. A three-year member of the executive committee of the ASA, Weems has represented his state on the board of direc- tors since 1979. And as member of the Mississippi Soybean Association for mor than 11 years, he has served a both vice president and presi. dent. Hollingsworth has served a, of the lVlisstssipp: Agricultural Aviation Associa. tion, as well as secretary ant board member for the NAAA GCJC continues fight for part-time funding Gulf Coast is gng to con- tinue its fight for legislation that would change the nmflmd now used to fund purt-tlme students attending the state's 15 public two-year schools. That is the decision of GC- IC's Board of Trustees, which .ms unanimously agreed that two bills now pending in the Legislature offer the best hope for solving a problem that has plagued Gulf Coast for several years. Trustee Murrell Hilton, chairman of the board's legislative committee, said college officials are "weary of doing battle" with the Mississippi Junior College President's Association, which opposes Gulf Coast's ef- forts to have the funding for- mula mandated into law. "All we are trying to do," said Hilton, "is to secure equitable funding for *every student attending the Junior colleges in this state." Under the current formula, jun/or colleges receive from he state only about M410 for a iull-time equivalent student. "A FTE is a composite of part-timers who together generate 24 student credit hours," Hilton explained. "But a full-time student, one whe is taking 12 or more semester hours during the day, brings in $1,5,. This is inequity at its worst," HiRon added. He said "a majority of the junior college presidents agree that changes are need- ed. And the association of. fered a compromise plan "that is basically the same as one we proposed a year ago. If calls for funding on a student credit hour basis." But Rlten said association members "don't want the plan to become state law. Every time we argue this point'with them, we come away with our heads bloodied." To finance the plan, the state would have to ap- propriate about $3.7 million in new money to be used during the throe-year implementa- tion period. "Gulf Coast wants the plan on the books, regardless of what the Legislature does about the money. The asseeia- tion doesn't," Hilton said. In an effort to strengthen its case with state lawmakers, GCJC officials have recently testified before Senate and House appropriations subcom- mittees. "We beli,ve both conuniV tees understand our problem. They have been receptive to our proposals and we have reason to believe they will make recommendations in our t favor," HAlton said. Perk Players chosen for World's Fair The Perk Players, a drama group of Missksippl Gulf Coast Junior College, has been selected to perform at the Mississippi Pavilion during the 1984 World's Fair, an- nonnced Kathryn Lewis. Lewls, speech and drama Ln* ructor at Perkinston, said the group will give two perfor- mances a day beginp.lg Wednesday, Oct. 17 through Sunday, Oct, 21. Mississippi "We have a l_ of w ork_! 'qmclL ahead of us," she sakL "The. skit, wldch will be about Mississippi, Is yet to be writ- ten. We will also have to recruit some drama students from the. high schools to replace our membe who are graduating." The group was selectea by the lrfonntng-Arts Scr tng Committee of the World's Fair t FLEHO BOOKBIJDINO ROUTE 1 BOX 42-^ QOITgAN, MS. 39355 CO,PANT 00;00one (gount!00 00nlerpri00;e "Gateway To The Beautiful Mississippi Gulf Coast" he 100th bit- of Henry Thomas was born on March ; the father of Mrs. ,RowelL , will be held In tbe Hall of the church March 11 at 2 p.m. relatives are in m Weidmg Semtm intensive two-day technology will March 15-16 at Coast Junior College's County campus at wRl be March 17 college in conJunctien will be from 1 L on March 15 on the cam- ,Pees are $30 for one day for two days for non- for one day or memO. for one day or $10 for pro bours will be from te 5 p.m. Mmh 15 and Additional laboratory for welding will be March 15. All on the  irornmtion call v Pratt 601-.2609, John at 601-935-13, or Phi; t at 601-?GS-S&77. Women's Cllb. regular montlffy of the Waen/s Club March 13 at 3 at the clubbouse. C. D. Rouse will lead Hostesses an Mrs Denson. are asked to b Cket O court clerks frnw state will meet at the Metrc Inn March 12-13 fm for the seminar in- appeals to circuit court Mississippi korenm field audit procedures, update, 1984 elec- locedures and stres will be from aJn, Monday, March will start at 9 a.m  and win on Tuesday, March ;II:15 a.m. Tree Lovers are a tree lover, don't Missmippi Seminar March 29 at the Extension Service, B Theater in is scheduled tc registration at City managers am beautificatior ; rare urged to attend. values or heine. To find ont e-t the semnmr and care for your trees, contact the Extension Ser- Daparmmnt at 5, Missmippi (601-335-3150), Urban Forester, v C, onm* Rohert E. Lee Jacks MS SB0" Msm Assoclatlm Marc, at the R.M. Lad- in Lisana. l. 1ter wtu be how to do the cle bark grae, and tte Star In a spec which hat an almUal even fm THUPDAY, MARCH 8, 1984 WIGGINS, MISSISSIPPI SINGLE COPY 15 CENTS (USPS s3oo) Three Mississippians take top offices MISSISSIPPFS COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE, Jim "Buck" Ross (center), presents plaques of recognition to newly-elected, top officers of national agricultural orgaulza- {ions, W.H. Houston HI, (left), chairman of The Cotton Foun- dation, and J.R. HollinBsworth, president of the national AgrlcuRm Aviation Association, at the "American Herige Program" Grower's Meeting in Greenv/lle. Ralph Weems, president of the American Soybean Association was Dot pre- sent to receive his plaque. L t. Col. Webb honored by Rotary Jay C. Webb, past president. and member of the Wiggins Rotary Club was named as a Paul Harris Fellow of Rotary tional in appraciat/on of his tansib and snm contr/lmfions to the Paul Har- ris FoandaUon of Rotary In- ternationaL Webb was presented with the Paul Harris certificate, medal and lapel pin by Rotary President J. Ed Mania in a ceremony on March 1 at the MGCJC cafeteria. This brings the number of Paul Harris Fellows with the Wiggins Rotary Club to eight. The other recipients are M.E. Cooper (deceased), John Dees, Ferris Butson, J. Ed Mania, Otho RowelI, Jimmy Gammage and Wayne McHemT. The Paul Harris Foundation is an international goodwill ef- fort funded by Rotarians on a volunterry basis to further education and friendship worldwide. It *involves ex- changing American groups and students with all free world countries, financing graduate studies and specialized educational grants and the -thermwe of better understanding and friendly relations between people of the world. Webb was bern and reared in Lmdsville, Ms., graduated from Lonme High Scol, and the University of Southern Mississippi. He spent 24 years in military, three years in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War H and 21 years in the U,S. Army und retired from the Army in June, 1979, with the rank of li col- onel. Webb participated in the vasion of Okinawa during Worm War H, was in the Korean conflict and serve two tours of duty in Vietnam. During his 24 years military caree be earned and was awarded military decorations including the Legion of Merit, Brome Star with an Oak Le Cluster, Army and Air Foro Commendation and th, Presidential Unit CRatlon, LL Col. Webb presently 5cads up the ROTC program at atom mgh Seboo He is married to the former Jeanelle Varnado of Wiggins and they have three children and four grandchildren. m Part of Amerlcs's real strength b tbe emftdeace tlmt we eaa aml will tske care of ourselves. Aid that's where U. S. 8av lm eeme in -- both' family and utlomal Umme LT. COL. JAY WEBB KAREN McQUIEN Four Perk secretaries named outstanding Four secretaries at Gulf Coast Junior College have been selected as an Out.stan- ding Young Woman of America for 1963. They are Karen McQueen of Saucier, and June Roberts, Sarah Mulvaney and Evelyn Strange, all of Gu. "The award recognizes the many young women who give their time, talents and unselfish service to enrich the quality of American life," said Margaret Arnold, chair- woman of the board of ad- visors of OYWA. "These women were selected from thousands of nominations sub- mired by respected business and civic leaders throughout the country," sheadded. McQneen, secretary to the vice president for instruc- tional affairs, is an honor graduate of Ocean Spring High School and MGCJC's Porkinston eamlms. She i president of t Mississippi Association of Educationa Secretaries. She is a member of Firs1 Baptist Church of McHenry and serves as organist and is Sunday School teacher. Mc- Queen and her husband W.A. Jr., am the parents of two children, Dale and Michelh. Her parents are Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Fulton of Saucier. Rober a graduate of Saint John High School and Perkinston campus, it secretary to the dean ot academic and general instruc- tion at the Jefferson Davis campus. Mulvaney, admissions secretary at Jefferson Davis, is a graduate of Biloxi High chool and an honor graduate of Jefferson Davis. Strange is secretary to the dean of business services at Jefferson Davis. She is a graduate of Harrison Central Military Mention SGT. CAMERON Tech. Sgt. Gary Cameron, son of Irene B. Cameron of Rural Route 4, Lucedale, has been decorated with the thini award of the Air Force COm- mendatio, Medal at Semba Air Base, West Germany. The Air Force Commenda- tion Medal is awarde0 t') tho. individuals who den.o, drate women High School where she rece/v- ed a Merit Award for scholastic achievement. I II illlllll For the record I III POLICE REPORT one arre DUI. Four arrests, speeding. Two arrests, false pretense. One arrest,  the peace. One arrest, burglary. Two arrests, grand tmmy. FIRE REPORT" March 3, grass fire, 5th and Stulin. SHERIFF REPORT One arrest, possession of stolen vehicle, speeding, reckless driving, aggravated assault, and resisting arrest. One arrest, possession of stolen property. One arrest, DUI, reckless driving, and suspended driver's license. One arrest, grand larceny. " formance of their duties on Three arrests, DUI. behalf of the Air Force. One arrest, buying and atoll- Cameron is an airfield ing stolon property. management supervisor with One arrest, contempt of the Mlst Combat Support Group. His wife, Marg/e, is the dauther of Lon M. Parker of Rural Route 2, Perkinston. cour Four arrests, public drunk. Three arrests, simple possession marijuana. Two arrests, felony sion of marijuana, concealad. weapon, recke dvg, Mississippi produces more than just cotton; Mississippi produces achievers. William Faulkner, Elvis Presley. Yet many, like novelist Eudora Welty and opera singer Leon- tyne Price, have names obscure to most. And certainly not all have faces that would turn heads in a crowd-Ralph Weerns, W.H. Houston, HI, J.R. Hollingsworth. But they're all notable Mississip- plans, and Weems, Houston and Hollingsworth, like others, are leaders in their fields. This trio of Mississippians are newly-elected, top officers of national agricultural organizations. Facing a full year in office, Weems is serv- ing as president of the American Soybean Associa- tion (ASA), Houston is acting as chairman of The Cotton Foundation, while Holl- ingsworth holds the position of president of the National Agricultural Aviation Associa- tion (NAAA). The ASA, a farmer- controlled organization work- Child abuse conference planned A one-day coherence on Child Abuse will be held on Tuesday, April 3 at the Col- iseum Ramada Inn in Jackson. The goal is to pro- vide a means by which par- ticipants can (I) encourage cmmnunity awareness of child abuse; (2) share information on innovative programs; and (3) learn from experienced and knowledgeable profes- sionals. Nine panel sessions and an all-day film theater are scheduled for the conference. Representatives from the medical, legal, and social ser- vices fields and from the business and private sector, including volunteers in com- munity service, social groups, PTA, etc., are invited to at- tend. A pre-regtstration fee of $12 is required which includes lunch and conference material& The deadline for registration is March 23. For more information con- tact the Mississippi Child AImse Corerence, 714 North State St., Jackson, Ms. 39201, phone 352-0175. Bell resumes leasing to disabled outstanding chieveme,t or, meritorious service in the per- Sou Contral Bell hes an- nounced that R is now offering a volume 1 handset and portable communications ter- minal for the hearing and/or pred customer. "We're pleased that we're once again able to offer these products to customers," ex- plalned Don Roberts, district manager, South Central Bell. Wlth tim divestiture of South Contral Bell from AT&T on January 1, lm4, the ownembip of equ/pmmt being leased by cushmm was transferred to AT&r. In order to meet the needs of disabled customers, the M1uiuippl Public Service Commm/on approved h Central Bell's request for per mission to once qjttn offer the equipment te now  on a leased bests. Ctmtomers interested in more infm-nmUon on these prodtz sheuld carl tim South Central Bell Customer He is a 1965 graduate of p0eseesion of schedule three ;Assistance Bureau at Leakesvflle High SchonL drngs, and poseesslon of beer. 1. ing to increase soybean pro- fits, has 26 affiliated state associations with about 24J}00 members. As a non-profit organization, The Cotton Foundation is responsible for research and education within the National Cotton Council of America. The Cotton Council's membership includes growers, ginners, warehousemen, seed crushers, merchants, cooperatives and manufac- turers. With 1,400 members, including operating com- panies, their pilots and allied industry, the NAAA coor- dinates and directs the efforts of the agricultural aviation in- dustry. Three officers of these na- tional organizations were honored at the "American Heritage Program" Grower's Meeting, sponsored by ICI Americas Inc. Jim "Buck" Ross, Mississippi's commis- sioner of agriculture, presented each leader with a plaque of recognition at the meeting held in Greenville, Miss. "Cotton and soybean growers from Mississippi gathered to honor these agricultural achievers and their success," says J.R. Huston, director of marketing at ICI Americas. Hudson, who addressed the evening meeting, says, "We at ICI were pleased to be able to sponsor',tl event for three Mississipplans. They are truly deserving of such recognition. "With extraordinarily similar backgrounds," Hnsdon adds, "these ac- complished individuals bring invaluable experience to their new positions." Each attended college in Mississippi, and to- day, living with 120 miles of each other, are all self- employed. Weems, a soybean grower, farms in the nor- thwest corner of the state in Tunica. As president of W.H. Houston & Sons, Inc., Houst has a large farming operation of cotton, rice and soybean. Further to the south in Shelby, the NAAA president, an agricultural aviator with 34 years of experience, also operates his own company, HoUingsworth Flying Service. Coupled with their business knowledge, each officer has a record of extensive involve- ment with their organization. After serving as president of the Delta Council in 1980,. Houston held the same posi- tion in 1982 at The Cotton Foundation. A three-year member of the executive committee of the ASA, Weems has represented his state on the board of direc- tors since 1979. And as member of the Mississippi Soybean Association for mor than 11 years, he has served a both vice president and presi. dent. Hollingsworth has served a, of the lVlisstssipp: Agricultural Aviation Associa. tion, as well as secretary ant board member for the NAAA GCJC continues fight for part-time funding Gulf Coast is gng to con- tinue its fight for legislation that would change the nmflmd now used to fund purt-tlme students attending the state's 15 public two-year schools. That is the decision of GC- IC's Board of Trustees, which .ms unanimously agreed that two bills now pending in the Legislature offer the best hope for solving a problem that has plagued Gulf Coast for several years. Trustee Murrell Hilton, chairman of the board's legislative committee, said college officials are "weary of doing battle" with the Mississippi Junior College President's Association, which opposes Gulf Coast's ef- forts to have the funding for- mula mandated into law. "All we are trying to do," said Hilton, "is to secure equitable funding for *every student attending the Junior colleges in this state." Under the current formula, jun/or colleges receive from he state only about M410 for a iull-time equivalent student. "A FTE is a composite of part-timers who together generate 24 student credit hours," Hilton explained. "But a full-time student, one whe is taking 12 or more semester hours during the day, brings in $1,5,. This is inequity at its worst," HiRon added. He said "a majority of the junior college presidents agree that changes are need- ed. And the association of. fered a compromise plan "that is basically the same as one we proposed a year ago. If calls for funding on a student credit hour basis." But Rlten said association members "don't want the plan to become state law. Every time we argue this point'with them, we come away with our heads bloodied." To finance the plan, the state would have to ap- propriate about $3.7 million in new money to be used during the throe-year implementa- tion period. "Gulf Coast wants the plan on the books, regardless of what the Legislature does about the money. The asseeia- tion doesn't," Hilton said. In an effort to strengthen its case with state lawmakers, GCJC officials have recently testified before Senate and House appropriations subcom- mittees. "We beli,ve both conuniV tees understand our problem. They have been receptive to our proposals and we have reason to believe they will make recommendations in our t favor," HAlton said. Perk Players chosen for World's Fair The Perk Players, a drama group of Missksippl Gulf Coast Junior College, has been selected to perform at the Mississippi Pavilion during the 1984 World's Fair, an- nonnced Kathryn Lewis. Lewls, speech and drama Ln* ructor at Perkinston, said the group will give two perfor- mances a day beginp.lg Wednesday, Oct. 17 through Sunday, Oct, 21. Mississippi "We have a l_ of w ork_! 'qmclL ahead of us," she sakL "The. skit, wldch will be about Mississippi, Is yet to be writ- ten. We will also have to recruit some drama students from the. high schools to replace our membe who are graduating." The group was selectea by the lrfonntng-Arts Scr tng Committee of the World's Fair t