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Stone County Enterprise
Wiggins , Mississippi
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January 11, 1979     Stone County Enterprise
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January 11, 1979
 

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STONE COUNTY ENTERPRISE-JANUARY ili 1 1979: Can America Halt Inflation&apos;s Fateful Foursome? The first glimmering of determination to fight and subdue inflation is finally showing itself in Washington. Will it last? Or will it flicker out at the first real gust of political pressure to continue the ways of big spending and big government that generated the problem in the first place? The inflation we suffer from today is a testament to the large dose of economic ignorance and the even larger dose of waffl- ing and political cowardice that have marked public policy for years. We've simply tried to do too much for too many, with- out the gumption to use fiscal and monetary restraints needed to keep the lid on inflation. So we have had: Government overspending. Ten years ago, federal ex- penditures were $185 billion and we ran a small budget surplus. Even then, the spending figure was considered enormous. To- day, expenditures are at halfa trillion dollars and the deficit adds up to around a billion dollars a week. Go back 30 years, to the height of the Fair Deal, and you find total outlays about one-fourteenth what they are now. That budget surplus 10 years ago, incidentally, was a fluke. The pattern since the 1950s has been red, not black ink|only two small surpluses in 20 years. The interest payment alone on the mushrooming federal debt created by deficits is, like the current deficit, also a billion dollars a week. Overtaxation. The average taxpayer works from Jan. I to May 4 each year, more than a third of the work year,just to pay for taxes at all levels--income, property, sales, Social Secu- rity. Taxes have increased much faster than personal income over the past decade and are now the largest single item in most family budgets. In 1976, the latest year for which we have hard figures, Americans paid $486 billion in taxesfederal, state and local. To put that in perspective, we spent $17 billion less than that on food, clothes and housing combined. In addition to socking individuals, the heavy tax bite on businesses has a direct economic effect in that the tax code tends to penalize companies that save up to expand and create more jobs. Overregulation. Regulation at all levels of government is estimated at a whopping $100 billion a year. This includes salaries at agencies charged with making regulations, the costs to businesses and individuals to comply with those regu- lations, and the "opportunity" costs, i.e., an estimate of the new products that didn't get produced and the jobs that didn't get created because of the time, money and energy detoured into regulatory compliance. All of these factors give an upward push to inflation--not least the fact that firms that pay out for regulation ultimately have to pass the costs along to consumers in the form of prices. Overblown bureaucracy. As government has swollen, so has the army of bureaucrats. The federal payroll has risen from 2 million in 1950 to about 2.8 million today. State and local government growth is even greaterfrom 4 million to nearly 13 million. Th'Ps, of course, means increased outlays and the risk of deficits. So big government translates into big inflation, and that spells trouble for us all. Nobody escapes inflation. But there are hopeful signs, too. Although there are hold- outs. a majority in Congress and the White House now label inflation the number one domestic problem. The President has put together a program that emphasizes government restraint and already is catching flak from the big spenders. Wage and price standards have been invoked. If the wage/price focus is matched by a determination to im- plement wiser and more prudent fiscal and monetary policies--which are the real answer to curbing inflation---then the battle may just be won. If not, then we are headed for more trouble and a dark and frightening future. I i Obituaries i I Mr. Bithel T. Price, 89, of Perkins|on died Dec. 29, 1978 at Stone County Hospital. Wiggins; ten grandchildren, and 7 great-grandchildren. His birthdate was October 9, Services were held Sunday, 1889 in Stone County. He was a ........ ..... lo - - r-- uee , at z pm at moore reuroa set-emp y(a Da |mr  " , .. "- ..... ,,,a, "^*'^r ^t ,=,,a.;_..^_ runeral Home unapel Wll/ll '+  ......... r n " " on "-tist Ch r" Reve e d Wflkms of-. p ucn ..... :  .: . .,. ;. .. "fieiating Interment was in tie is survIvrI oy nls wile; ..... "  . wooalawn Geme[ery Mrs. Mary Louise Price of Perkins|on; two sons, James Pallbearers were Neal Cooper, Marvin Meadows, Joe Byrum, Benny Warren, Carl Breland and Clozell Cooper. Mr. Hubert Ardell Hall, 66, of Wiggins died Dec. 20,1978 at Stone County Hospital following a lengthy illness. He was born in Stone County Elliott Price, Houston, Texas; M.M. Price of Gulfport, three daughters; Mrs. Mary Alice Standard, Long Meadow, Mass., Mrs. Maxine Hartup, Melrose, Fla., two sisters; Mrs. Jessie Reeves. Pascagoula; Mrs. Bertie McWilliams, Jackson, Miss.; one brother, K.C. Price of iH i f II Citizens Forum U. S. Losing Credibility In Recognizing Red China Br Gr.ona- W. Sm,NNON i It s.cm. |,credible that a Pres- tilt, presence of cqements of the idc,t .f the United States v,,ould I_'. S. fleet in the Taiwanese su&h*.lx bctrav a trusted ally Straits prevented ari occupation aud cmbratc a, <,xil atzainst (if Taiwan I)v Communist troops uhich this corn/try hmgld a h'om the miiinland. costh l)ittt'r war h)r "0 v('ars, Whih' the United States was ) but t+lHt is x h:a I resident (3artt.r fig, hting its "no-win" war in Viet- ham and los|hE its I)atlle to "c(nttaiu" Communism. tile Re- public of China (m Taiwan was establishing itself as the "show- vast. of: denloerat.y" in Asia. Not .nlv was it preventing the spre,ld of Communism. but it also was making such t'eat l)rotQ+ess as a "free enterprise +' nat|on that it ranked sec<)nd only to Jilpitll tS an eeollonic power ill tilt' Fiir East. American parents and wives who 16st sons and huslmnds in tilt. Vietnam War n,w have all tilt. lnore reason |o (lilt'st|oil OI11" national h,adership+ I| the eml)race t)f Communist China was to }+ec.orne desirabh. iu the not-so-distant future, wily th(,. was it necessary for 56.,6 Americans and 1.3 1;lillion Viet- namese to give their lives tt try t<) "'contain" (:.mmu,lism? Vth;,' was it that another 303.704 Americans were wounded some of them maimed for lift'? Why w.+, it th:tt Ill(' United States c.nmlittcd a tolal of 8.744.1t1X) mt+n to the h.tttle7 \\;Vhv did wc wash, $141 billi, n in wart|m<' "aid" to South Vietnam*--n<lt to. mention an()th('r S4115 millio. necessar> t<) resettle 1:?,5.(I()0 Vietttalnt,st' rt'|tlEt'es ilt this c<.mtrv+" Thel:e .re tht)st, "xho hohl thd tilt' L'.ited States zs mereh ac- C+'l)tm "re,tlity" in rec<)ni/m. Red Chill t .ts lht' "'true China" and thai it is iu the American pt'ol)h,':, "|lest il,h'rt'sts" It) ]laxt" trade and cultural relations with the worhl's rmst l>puhms na- tion, These same r, eoph. some- Imw feel that Chinese Commun- isa's are less t<) Iw feared than Russian Commt,nists. althtlugh their ideology is lmsieallv sim- /lar. TlW truth is that it is Red ha <hm. N .taldishing diplo- ,n.dit + rvLl,i,)ns with l{cd China. Bx , sinh' Sit' l) in which he at)r:th'd this nation's dch,tlse tr('al . x ith tilt' ]h'lml)lic o[ China (,+ T,,ixx.tn while r.cog- Ill/lll the ( ;Oll/lllllllist l't'llll(> (m mainl;tnd ('hina ;ts tile true L[(I; I.'l'lllll(qt| Ot ,dl Chincse IWO- pit'. tilt' IJli'sich'llt hds ontr,tt'd millions .l Ainvlic,ms and left OII1 liSt, It .{)% crlllltellt ])itterly dis idvd+ .t the" san. + film', the I)resi- "(Icni h,ts (.,tN..('d the United btltt('.. 1, 1<'. la't'--II()t (mlv ill tht (hic.t. l+.t .m. K free .at,;Hs thr,.,z].mt tht, world. Ih't+sid+lit ChianL, Chin-kuo of tht \\;ati{,t,dist '_')', t*lqlltlulit (m "l',i an--sl)u <)I tilt' fat+' (h,n- cralissimo Chian Kai-shek, Allit,l+i(+t , ,,xartimt, military ally said ol (,tl'tt'l"s xt'ti<)n: "'The t+lfitcd Slatc llxcrll- Illel]{ e:llllH)t h{' --IIccted to halt{ , the clntidttc tit :liP. |roe natiol in tht tutur<"+ Vthu c;tu th'uv lh,|t (;tli+|i| (]hin+ktil> i lil;t? Pri(ir t{) ItS withdt':twal of troops fl+om Vietnam in 1973 the Unitvd States had fouzht the hmzcst war i, its history to try to "tolitiiil(" (ollnlltlllisn ']'in'llihotlt this hllt t'ollfliet the Oll('lliV %Vi|' IIOt jiist the Cnm- I/Hlliisi lt.llilt , (it .\\;(n'th Vict- II;ilii. tnlt ,ib,|) lhl" (]()lltlilillliSl 7o,(.rnilii,iits ot Ilt.<l (]hiii.i tilid So h't Ib,,,i l+ t53. t</tll\\; tth*l II hi'+ C;il/il+ ctlitrodtxl ill the \\;iCIliaill %V.;|I'. the United States also signed it inlittlal defense treaty witll + the Nationalist Chinese goxernment on Taiwan+ Under terms of th(' afrccment, each ii;lliOll would conic" tO the other's defel/se ill ilt. event of Illl at- tat.k. Two years earlier, in 19.53. on July 1, 1912 and was a life time resident. He was co-founder of Hall's Food Mart in 1929 and was alfdliated in tls+immaesfev> , years. A member of the First United Methodist Church he was a former member of the official board. He was a member of Masonic Lodge No. 481 in Wiggins. Services were held Dec. 22 at 2 p.m. at Moore Funeral Home Chapel with interment in Woodlawn Cemetery. Reverend Elton Brow: and Rev. W.R. Dement officiated. Serving as pallbearers were A.B. Willimoes, Q.B. Preston China, not tile Unitcd St<|tc-. which will tlerixe the icatcr |)ent'fit front the li('XV /cc(lld l)t'- Iweeli the lxx<| li;ilit)iis, l(cd Chin.i fraliklv ackliovcledcs th:|t it xxants "to use Alllcric|l| capitalist know-how t dcxclop its xv.tterwavs, huikl its dams and bridta,s, t>xphnc |is oil tichls. exp;u'ld its al.(rieu]ture and inod- elltiZe its t.itics---illsl ;,s Ihlssi:i h.l, dollt,. \\;Vheii cil] t]ii, hiis I)cci/ act'oniplished, will (illF lC- Llli||n xxitli (Thiil.I I)t' illiX It's'> l)rec;iriol|s thtll it is rod;i\\;" with l{llSSia7 Will wc h.ixt, incr,,ist,d lil" nation.tl dcbt by addition |1 billiotls o( dollars to ti:lancc the growth ot thc xcrv samv Com- ItltilliSlli xv|iich WC h'ied tt hard tO "'C(lltttlhl "u It should 1)t' noted that Pi+t's - idcnt (];irlcr a](liie liiiil iiot htLli' lhe rt'l)onsihiliix for l/axiil willidr'lwil t)lii + rct+Oliiti(In d "l'aiv,'ai] as ihc scat of (]hin<l's real ,lt)vel'linlent. I It' has li|Oi't'lv I)roulhl I|) t.|lli(.hiioit dil :it.litlli initiated Iw |Ollnt'r l)r.<idt.iil N'ison in i+)71 aiid at[,,ilio('tl }re Ni\\;<)n' lilit,]t.c,tt>|l SllCC+t,,4..ll- (crald Ford Ncl'rlheh'ss. it i, Prcsidcnl (]il'h'r .lio has ach'd ilililih.r- ill|)', xvilhout t'<lil..uliili ( ]llii+ IZl'('ss. to Slll,lsh l]ic (h+cAlll tit 17 illil]ioii (]hiii'se Oil "l+ai..<|ll who lixc f.r lht' tt,Iv xxheil ,|ll ot tht+ petlph" t)t n!aillliliid Chiiia lliihl ]Ltxe a go'CrlllnClil .is h't,{+ ,i lheir liwi] has been. II is li'c - i(lelit (].|l'tt'r who h.i (>Otlilliittt'tt (lllr li;ili(/il to ;ill ;it./.(n'd with ConllFIIIlliMI1--ii/)t llli i)111+ i}%tll lt'l'lil, l)ilt t)ll itvd (Jhili,i', And il i l>r'sidcnt (drlcr \\;l.t lul litiiM tact' th( llllll,llii ',xr<llli Ol lili('lit';il, xxhll h'l'i lhdt ]+,lh liil,il and ii,itiolls <houltl |)e as .vIod .is lht,ir xvord---lh.it .t treaty Js it Ire;if>. lillt il xt oi'thh's d(K'llnlent to I)c tos(,d aidc ,it either p:artv's e<ll/Vellielit'c At :l tinie a|ieli OllF crvdibility .|l- ready is |leiilt[ sirAined ihr|ltlh- out the world we Olii ill afford io Itle Ollr Yiitit|nal honor. Mrs. Blanche Prine of Wiggins and Mrs. "Beulah Breland of Elmer Lee, Janes Brelana, Bond. Curtis Hickman and Buren .Alexander. He is survived by his wife, Ab 1 Rainfall Mrs:+-+'Christine Hall of ove-norma Wfgg'$; tht daughtersT '+]: ' ' +': ..... ': Patt'l++ia > A. Coch,an of + Exp d In wiggins, Miss Emily P. Hall cte of Gautier, Miss., Mrs. Mary C. Brehm of Milton, Fla.; two sons; Robert Ardell Hall and Mississippi will have near- prevent additional land James M. Hall, both of normal temperatures and preparation. Wiggins; one sister, Mrs. above-medianprecipitation in Poultrymen can expect Elwood (Margaret An- January, according to the several cold frontal passages ne)Taylor of Perkinston; two National Weather Service accompanied by rapid brothers, D.H. Hall, both of agricultural weather outlook changes in temperatures. Wiggins; his mother, Mrs. distributed by the Mississippi Above-normal rainfall is H.C. Hall of Wiggins and 6 Cooperative Extension Ser- expected to cause extended grandchildren, vice. periods of cold, damp Extensive rainfall in late w e a t h e r , s a y December and greater-than, agrometeorologists at the normal precipitation in Environmental Studies Januaury will probably Service Center in Stoneville. Mrs. Dan R. Moore, 70 of Wiggins died Dec. 29, 1978 at Forrest General Hospital. Her birthdate was May 29, 29, 1908, in Forrest County. She was a member of Ebenezer Baptist Church. She is survived by her husband, Mr. Dan R. Moore of Wiggins; one daughter, Mrs. Ruby Nell Rayburn of Wiggins; one son; Harland R. (Billy) Moore of Savannah, Ga.; three sisters; Mrs. Price Snowden, Gulfport; Mrs. Beatrice Clingon and Mrs. Betty Register, both of Hat- tiesburg; 6 grandchildren and 2 great-randchildren. Services were held Sunday, Dec. 31 at 3:30 p.m. at Moore Funeral Home Chapel with interment in Fairley Cemetery. Reverend elan Johnson officiated. Serving as pall bearers were Thomas E. Johnson, Everett L. Clingon, Garlan Moore, Ben C. Patrick, Ralph Moore, and Hugh Snowden. Mr. Thomas Edward Owens, 60, of Wiggins died Dec. 21, 1978 at Stone County Hospital. His birthdate was Sept. 26, 1918 at DeLo. Miss. and he was a carpenter. Serwces were held Satur- day, Dee. 23, at 3 p.m. at Moore Funeral Home Chapel with interment in Ten Mile Cemetery. Reverend Douglas Pitts officiated. Pallbearers were Raz Davis, Will Fiveash, Delmer Fiveasb, Terry Amacker, James L. Fulcher and Jeff Ladner. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Arlene Owens of Wiggins; two daughters; Mrs. Patsey Finnley of Atlanta, Ga., Tommy Lee Owens of Lucedale; one son, Douglas Owens of Bond: two sisters, Let's Not Indict Eggs ByEd Blake-Ag Affairs Innocent until proven guilty may be the hallmark of American justice, but time and again this standard is abandoned by modern society as alleged guilt causes a lot of innocent things to have to prove and reprove their in- nocence. Not since Haropty Dumpty sat on a great wall has the egg image been so fractured as it has been during recent years because some scientists feared the unknown and at- tributed a parallel between egg eating, cholesterol levels in the human body and a predisposition to a heart at- tack. Well ahead of Easter it would be well to clear the air a bit, so the millions of parents and grandparents who follow the little gang around the yard, salt shaker in hand to gorge on the dropped and broken Easter eggs, may participate in their annual excesses without undue traumatic concerns. Recently the National Commission on Egg Nutrition has brought forth some of the latest findings and beliefs concerning egRs and cholesterol - and the news is heat'tening, no pun intended. First let's look at the egg's c, itribution to human health. Eggs provide excellent protein containing the amino acids which the body needs but can't manufacture. Through egg eating we can borrow on fowl resources to the degree that a single egg supplies 10-15 percent of the recommended daily allowance for protein. Egg., also supply vitamins A, the E complex, D, E, and K as well as iron, copper, sulfur. magnesium, phosphorus, and choline. And, eggs are easily digestible, widely available, and relatively inexpensive as January" BEV'S BLAZE long trip. Suddenly he turned to his father and said; "I wish you'd let Mom drive - it's more exciting." Bumper Snicker. "Pay your taxes early. I need my relief check right away." Reverend and Mrs. N. J. Lee of Wiggins celebrated their 68th wedding an- niversary Monday, Jan. 8, 1979. The Ralph Burton's celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary in December. The Girl Scouts will be taking cookie orders. Jan. 12- 20. In the mail today Monday) I received several pieces of mail that had been sent Dec. 22. How's that for service! Special days in February. 2 -Ground Hog Day; 4 - 10 Boy Scout Week; 12 - Abraham Lincoln's birthday; 14 - St. Valentine's Day; 17 24 Future Farmers of America Week; 18 - 24 Brotherhood Week; 22 - George Washington's birthday; 26 - total eclipse of the sun; 28 - Ash Wednesday, Lent begins - ends Good Friday (April 13 - Easter is April 15.) Vic and I caught a bug about 6 weeks ago and it won't go away. Any remedies (aside from cutting our heads off) would be appreciated. We are tired of being sick. R was recently reported that inmates in New York City jails were receiving $270,000 a year worth of relief checks. According to Dacan Associates, Chicago food consultants, the typical Thanksgiving Day dinner this year exceeded 2,000 calories, compared with 575 calories consumed by the Pilgrims back in 1621. Humorist Mark Russell offers his definRion of in- flation; "When you pay cash, they ask to see your drive," ' lieense." Did you know that tomatoes are 93 percent water? Kenneth Snodderly of Key West, Fla. reported his $65 Gucci handbag stolen con- mining the following items: a matching Gucci wallet (value $30), a Tiffany lighter ($180), $50 in cash, a checkbook and worth of food stamps. In the first quarter of 1978, the national median price of a new house in the U.S. has gone over the f,50,000 ceiling to about $54,000. That's com- pared to a cost of $,000 for 1977. The new total is more than three times the median U.S. Family income. Sign ina travel agency. "Go Away." A small boy was bored on a a source of high quality protein. In recent years however, much comment on egg nutrition has been addressed to the cholesterol content of egg, with some suggesting that cholesterol may influence the development of coronary heart disease. The egg people, on good authority, say 'taint so. Here's why. Cholesterol is an essential substance in the human body, enabling your nerves to transmit impulses thru your body. Your nerve system would be like a tractor out of grease and oil if you didn't have an adequate supply of cholesterol. In short, you must have it or you die. However, this is not to say that cholesterol needed to sustain life must come from your diet. The body can manufacture your own. Tlere are two kinds of cholesterol. Dietary cholesterol is that which is cntained in foods of animal origin which we eat. Serum cholesterd is that which circulates in the blood stream attached to particles called lipoproteins. Today some scientists believe high levels of one form of lipoproteins protects against coronary heart disease while another type may be an indicator of increased risk of high disease. The great debafe among the eggheads is "what exactly is the relationship between dietary and cholesterol?" dosages of cholesterol certain animals has shown to raise cholesterol, with some results with hmmms. this cloudy area recent periments show that consumption of cholesterol through eggs not raised serum when added to otht balanced diets. Some of people involved in the added from one fresh eggs daffy to their diets for weeks and without significant change] their mean serum levels. : All of this is not to say to cholesterol in the that the effect of cholesterol on cholesterol is fully derstood. But what does it  thinking people, and to doctors and researchers, that it would appear to lie false premise to tie the egg! heart disease. The troversy is yet although the best tends to fail to indict eggs culprit as far as the heart concerned. And in no certain terms, eggs' tribution to nutritional is hard to know, even ff may not have cracked entire run of false regarding cholesterol. LIBERTY LINES- Free China WASHINGTON (Liberty Lobby Ne,as Service)--Jimmy Carter's betrayal of the Republic of Free China on Talc, an consummates a + 33-year .nsplrao,' by tile US. State Departrflerlt and inter: national financiers to insure a total commumst victor, in China and the destruction of the Nationalist t'hinese+ The U.S. Senate un- covered the conspiracy 2b years ago For tbose of you not old enough to remember, t-he years 1048-19.54 erc a time of great public re- act|on against communist sub- crsion in the U.S. in the ake of the Alger Hiss spy case and the Julius and Ethel Rosenberg atomic secrets sp> case. as ,,ell as others too numerous to mention. the people rose up and demanded action. One result vas that the U.S. Senalc conducted a special investigation into hy China fell to the communists. The ehairm=n of the investigative committee was tbe late Sen. Pat McCarran tD-Nex.} and a majority of the committee members were Demo- crals. Neserthetess. when the commit- tec concluded its year-long in- quir.v, it reported that a wide- ranging conspiracy, reaching into tbe highest levels of the State Department and the White House. involving American communists and Soviet agents, ,,,.'as respon- sible for the communist victory in China. The committee reported that a small group of communists had. since 1945. directed and manip- ulated American policy in China to insure that the communist forces led by the late Mao Tse.tung v, outd triumph. If you can remember those years, see hat these names mean tO VOU: Owen Lattimore. The Commit- tee concluded that he had been a conscious, articulate instrument of the Soviet conspiracy since the 1930's. Yet, Lattimore was a adviser to President Truman America's China policy. John Stewart Servie? Thb State Deoa'rt ment: regarding China wa cspionage in 1945. it took eight years to get around canning him. and he had his back  ithin three years. The resuh of these and other revelations as Ihat the China lobby was driven ground fi,r a flew years. publicl> re-surfaced in the It,0"s. especially in the .Iohn,,on Administration. Significantly. the first State Department spokesml/t the Iq60"s to engineer a of Taian tas Robcrt an associate of Lattimore ftmd 1940"s. The McCarran discovered that Bennett was pro-commun,it as well. Ima >ears after their report. was Mill in the State more influential than ever i As tile l=rem:h sty, "The things change, the more the same." Apd if things do the same. or get worse, it because the same people behind it all: the R-kefelle. I'he Rockefellers wcrc g, oup called the Institute Policy Studies in the Iq44Ts. v, as the nmjor, recruiting for the communist agents orchestrated the fall of Chilm. Today the Rockefellers ulate policy thnmgh tl,dr lateral Commission, Irhal no coincidence, then. that the" Chinese gave Cot:a-Cola a poly in their count'. The man of Coca-Cola is J. Austin, a member of the feller Trilateral The Chinese know who run in Ameriea... even if you don't' Aw., S.g.. W*M D.C- #.++.rl, r., I- #I,-i0/M0.+Io+, .#t, ,. OFFICIAL ORGAN OF STONE MEMBER Nat/onal Newsll ASNetSM PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY, STONE COUNTY Izrrmmm me. P.O. Box WZGGmS, ibiS. EDITOR& PUBLISIIER BEVERLY R. YINGLING ,  L "A LEADER IN COMMUNITY ENTERED WEEKLY AS SECOND CLAim JULY 3, 19115 AT 'lille  OFFICE IN WlII] UNDER ACT OF CONGRE - MARCH 1 1171. 1 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION STONE COUNTY & SERVICE PERS0NNL ELSEWHERE IN MISSII]p OUT OF STATE 'REEDOM OF THE PRESS - Freedom of file guarded as a vital right of mlnkird. R is right to discuss whatever is not expllcltly hiliii Iff cludin. g,me wlada of may  [] STONE COUNTY ENTERPRISE-JANUARY ili 1 1979: Can America Halt Inflation's Fateful Foursome? The first glimmering of determination to fight and subdue inflation is finally showing itself in Washington. Will it last? Or will it flicker out at the first real gust of political pressure to continue the ways of big spending and big government that generated the problem in the first place? The inflation we suffer from today is a testament to the large dose of economic ignorance and the even larger dose of waffl- ing and political cowardice that have marked public policy for years. We've simply tried to do too much for too many, with- out the gumption to use fiscal and monetary restraints needed to keep the lid on inflation. So we have had: Government overspending. Ten years ago, federal ex- penditures were $185 billion and we ran a small budget surplus. Even then, the spending figure was considered enormous. To- day, expenditures are at halfa trillion dollars and the deficit adds up to around a billion dollars a week. Go back 30 years, to the height of the Fair Deal, and you find total outlays about one-fourteenth what they are now. That budget surplus 10 years ago, incidentally, was a fluke. The pattern since the 1950s has been red, not black ink|only two small surpluses in 20 years. The interest payment alone on the mushrooming federal debt created by deficits is, like the current deficit, also a billion dollars a week. Overtaxation. The average taxpayer works from Jan. I to May 4 each year, more than a third of the work year,just to pay for taxes at all levels--income, property, sales, Social Secu- rity. Taxes have increased much faster than personal income over the past decade and are now the largest single item in most family budgets. In 1976, the latest year for which we have hard figures, Americans paid $486 billion in taxesfederal, state and local. To put that in perspective, we spent $17 billion less than that on food, clothes and housing combined. In addition to socking individuals, the heavy tax bite on businesses has a direct economic effect in that the tax code tends to penalize companies that save up to expand and create more jobs. Overregulation. Regulation at all levels of government is estimated at a whopping $100 billion a year. This includes salaries at agencies charged with making regulations, the costs to businesses and individuals to comply with those regu- lations, and the "opportunity" costs, i.e., an estimate of the new products that didn't get produced and the jobs that didn't get created because of the time, money and energy detoured into regulatory compliance. All of these factors give an upward push to inflation--not least the fact that firms that pay out for regulation ultimately have to pass the costs along to consumers in the form of prices. Overblown bureaucracy. As government has swollen, so has the army of bureaucrats. The federal payroll has risen from 2 million in 1950 to about 2.8 million today. State and local government growth is even greaterfrom 4 million to nearly 13 million. Th'Ps, of course, means increased outlays and the risk of deficits. So big government translates into big inflation, and that spells trouble for us all. Nobody escapes inflation. But there are hopeful signs, too. Although there are hold- outs. a majority in Congress and the White House now label inflation the number one domestic problem. The President has put together a program that emphasizes government restraint and already is catching flak from the big spenders. Wage and price standards have been invoked. If the wage/price focus is matched by a determination to im- plement wiser and more prudent fiscal and monetary policies--which are the real answer to curbing inflation---then the battle may just be won. If not, then we are headed for more trouble and a dark and frightening future. I i Obituaries i I Mr. Bithel T. Price, 89, of Perkins|on died Dec. 29, 1978 at Stone County Hospital. Wiggins; ten grandchildren, and 7 great-grandchildren. His birthdate was October 9, Services were held Sunday, 1889 in Stone County. He was a ........ ..... lo - - r-- uee , at z pm at moore reuroa set-emp y(a Da |mr  " , .. "- ..... ,,,a, "^*'^r ^t ,=,,a.;_..^_ runeral Home unapel Wll/ll '+  ......... r n " " on "-tist Ch r" Reve e d Wflkms of-. p ucn ..... :  .: . .,. ;. .. "fieiating Interment was in tie is survIvrI oy nls wile; ..... "  . wooalawn Geme[ery Mrs. Mary Louise Price of Perkins|on; two sons, James Pallbearers were Neal Cooper, Marvin Meadows, Joe Byrum, Benny Warren, Carl Breland and Clozell Cooper. Mr. Hubert Ardell Hall, 66, of Wiggins died Dec. 20,1978 at Stone County Hospital following a lengthy illness. He was born in Stone County Elliott Price, Houston, Texas; M.M. Price of Gulfport, three daughters; Mrs. Mary Alice Standard, Long Meadow, Mass., Mrs. Maxine Hartup, Melrose, Fla., two sisters; Mrs. Jessie Reeves. Pascagoula; Mrs. Bertie McWilliams, Jackson, Miss.; one brother, K.C. Price of iH i f II Citizens Forum U. S. Losing Credibility In Recognizing Red China Br Gr.ona- W. Sm,NNON i It s.cm. |,credible that a Pres- tilt, presence of cqements of the idc,t .f the United States v,,ould I_'. S. fleet in the Taiwanese su&h*.lx bctrav a trusted ally Straits prevented ari occupation aud cmbratc a, <,xil atzainst (if Taiwan I)v Communist troops uhich this corn/try hmgld a h'om the miiinland. costh l)ittt'r war h)r "0 v('ars, Whih' the United States was ) but t+lHt is x h:a I resident (3artt.r fig, hting its "no-win" war in Viet- ham and los|hE its I)atlle to "c(nttaiu" Communism. tile Re- public of China (m Taiwan was establishing itself as the "show- vast. of: denloerat.y" in Asia. Not .nlv was it preventing the spre,ld of Communism. but it also was making such t'eat l)rotQ+ess as a "free enterprise +' nat|on that it ranked sec<)nd only to Jilpitll tS an eeollonic power ill tilt' Fiir East. American parents and wives who 16st sons and huslmnds in tilt. Vietnam War n,w have all tilt. lnore reason |o (lilt'st|oil OI11" national h,adership+ I| the eml)race t)f Communist China was to }+ec.orne desirabh. iu the not-so-distant future, wily th(,. was it necessary for 56.,6 Americans and 1.3 1;lillion Viet- namese to give their lives tt try t<) "'contain" (:.mmu,lism? Vth;,' was it that another 303.704 Americans were wounded some of them maimed for lift'? Why w.+, it th:tt Ill(' United States c.nmlittcd a tolal of 8.744.1t1X) mt+n to the h.tttle7 \\;Vhv did wc wash, $141 billi, n in wart|m<' "aid" to South Vietnam*--n<lt to. mention an()th('r S4115 millio. necessar> t<) resettle 1:?,5.(I()0 Vietttalnt,st' rt'|tlEt'es ilt this c<.mtrv+" Thel:e .re tht)st, "xho hohl thd tilt' L'.ited States zs mereh ac- C+'l)tm "re,tlity" in rec<)ni/m. Red Chill t .ts lht' "'true China" and thai it is iu the American pt'ol)h,':, "|lest il,h'rt'sts" It) ]laxt" trade and cultural relations with the worhl's rmst l>puhms na- tion, These same r, eoph. some- Imw feel that Chinese Commun- isa's are less t<) Iw feared than Russian Commt,nists. althtlugh their ideology is lmsieallv sim- /lar. TlW truth is that it is Red ha <hm. N .taldishing diplo- ,n.dit + rvLl,i,)ns with l{cd China. Bx , sinh' Sit' l) in which he at)r:th'd this nation's dch,tlse tr('al . x ith tilt' ]h'lml)lic o[ China (,+ T,,ixx.tn while r.cog- Ill/lll the ( ;Oll/lllllllist l't'llll(> (m mainl;tnd ('hina ;ts tile true L[(I; I.'l'lllll(qt| Ot ,dl Chincse IWO- pit'. tilt' IJli'sich'llt hds ontr,tt'd millions .l Ainvlic,ms and left OII1 liSt, It .{)% crlllltellt ])itterly dis idvd+ .t the" san. + film', the I)resi- "(Icni h,ts (.,tN..('d the United btltt('.. 1, 1<'. la't'--II()t (mlv ill tht (hic.t. l+.t .m. K free .at,;Hs thr,.,z].mt tht, world. Ih't+sid+lit ChianL, Chin-kuo of tht \\;ati{,t,dist '_')', t*lqlltlulit (m "l',i an--sl)u <)I tilt' fat+' (h,n- cralissimo Chian Kai-shek, Allit,l+i(+t , ,,xartimt, military ally said ol (,tl'tt'l"s xt'ti<)n: "'The t+lfitcd Slatc llxcrll- Illel]{ e:llllH)t h{' --IIccted to halt{ , the clntidttc tit :liP. |roe natiol in tht tutur<"+ Vthu c;tu th'uv lh,|t (;tli+|i| (]hin+ktil> i lil;t? Pri(ir t{) ItS withdt':twal of troops fl+om Vietnam in 1973 the Unitvd States had fouzht the hmzcst war i, its history to try to "tolitiiil(" (ollnlltlllisn ']'in'llihotlt this hllt t'ollfliet the Oll('lliV %Vi|' IIOt jiist the Cnm- I/Hlliisi lt.llilt , (it .\\;(n'th Vict- II;ilii. tnlt ,ib,|) lhl" (]()lltlilillliSl 7o,(.rnilii,iits ot Ilt.<l (]hiii.i tilid So h't Ib,,,i l+ t53. t</tll\\; tth*l II hi'+ C;il/il+ ctlitrodtxl ill the \\;iCIliaill %V.;|I'. the United States also signed it inlittlal defense treaty witll + the Nationalist Chinese goxernment on Taiwan+ Under terms of th(' afrccment, each ii;lliOll would conic" tO the other's defel/se ill ilt. event of Illl at- tat.k. Two years earlier, in 19.53. on July 1, 1912 and was a life time resident. He was co-founder of Hall's Food Mart in 1929 and was alfdliated in tls+immaesfev> , years. A member of the First United Methodist Church he was a former member of the official board. He was a member of Masonic Lodge No. 481 in Wiggins. Services were held Dec. 22 at 2 p.m. at Moore Funeral Home Chapel with interment in Woodlawn Cemetery. Reverend Elton Brow: and Rev. W.R. Dement officiated. Serving as pallbearers were A.B. Willimoes, Q.B. Preston China, not tile Unitcd St<|tc-. which will tlerixe the icatcr |)ent'fit front the li('XV /cc(lld l)t'- Iweeli the lxx<| li;ilit)iis, l(cd Chin.i fraliklv ackliovcledcs th:|t it xxants "to use Alllcric|l| capitalist know-how t dcxclop its xv.tterwavs, huikl its dams and bridta,s, t>xphnc |is oil tichls. exp;u'ld its al.(rieu]ture and inod- elltiZe its t.itics---illsl ;,s Ihlssi:i h.l, dollt,. \\;Vheii cil] t]ii, hiis I)cci/ act'oniplished, will (illF lC- Llli||n xxitli (Thiil.I I)t' illiX It's'> l)rec;iriol|s thtll it is rod;i\\;" with l{llSSia7 Will wc h.ixt, incr,,ist,d lil" nation.tl dcbt by addition |1 billiotls o( dollars to ti:lancc the growth ot thc xcrv samv Com- ItltilliSlli xv|iich WC h'ied tt hard tO "'C(lltttlhl "u It should 1)t' noted that Pi+t's - idcnt (];irlcr a](liie liiiil iiot htLli' lhe rt'l)onsihiliix for l/axiil willidr'lwil t)lii + rct+Oliiti(In d "l'aiv,'ai] as ihc scat of (]hin<l's real ,lt)vel'linlent. I It' has li|Oi't'lv I)roulhl I|) t.|lli(.hiioit dil :it.litlli initiated Iw |Ollnt'r l)r.<idt.iil N'ison in i+)71 aiid at[,,ilio('tl }re Ni\\;<)n' lilit,]t.c,tt>|l SllCC+t,,4..ll- (crald Ford Ncl'rlheh'ss. it i, Prcsidcnl (]il'h'r .lio has ach'd ilililih.r- ill|)', xvilhout t'<lil..uliili ( ]llii+ IZl'('ss. to Slll,lsh l]ic (h+cAlll tit 17 illil]ioii (]hiii'se Oil "l+ai..<|ll who lixc f.r lht' tt,Iv xxheil ,|ll ot tht+ petlph" t)t n!aillliliid Chiiia lliihl ]Ltxe a go'CrlllnClil .is h't,{+ ,i lheir liwi] has been. II is li'c - i(lelit (].|l'tt'r who h.i (>Otlilliittt'tt (lllr li;ili(/il to ;ill ;it./.(n'd with ConllFIIIlliMI1--ii/)t llli i)111+ i}%tll lt'l'lil, l)ilt t)ll itvd (Jhili,i', And il i l>r'sidcnt (drlcr \\;l.t lul litiiM tact' th( llllll,llii ',xr<llli Ol lili('lit';il, xxhll h'l'i lhdt ]+,lh liil,il and ii,itiolls <houltl |)e as .vIod .is lht,ir xvord---lh.it .t treaty Js it Ire;if>. lillt il xt oi'thh's d(K'llnlent to I)c tos(,d aidc ,it either p:artv's e<ll/Vellielit'c At :l tinie a|ieli OllF crvdibility .|l- ready is |leiilt[ sirAined ihr|ltlh- out the world we Olii ill afford io Itle Ollr Yiitit|nal honor. Mrs. Blanche Prine of Wiggins and Mrs. "Beulah Breland of Elmer Lee, Janes Brelana, Bond. Curtis Hickman and Buren .Alexander. He is survived by his wife, Ab 1 Rainfall Mrs:+-+'Christine Hall of ove-norma Wfgg'$; tht daughtersT '+]: ' ' +': ..... ': Patt'l++ia > A. Coch,an of + Exp d In wiggins, Miss Emily P. Hall cte of Gautier, Miss., Mrs. Mary C. Brehm of Milton, Fla.; two sons; Robert Ardell Hall and Mississippi will have near- prevent additional land James M. Hall, both of normal temperatures and preparation. Wiggins; one sister, Mrs. above-medianprecipitation in Poultrymen can expect Elwood (Margaret An- January, according to the several cold frontal passages ne)Taylor of Perkinston; two National Weather Service accompanied by rapid brothers, D.H. Hall, both of agricultural weather outlook changes in temperatures. Wiggins; his mother, Mrs. distributed by the Mississippi Above-normal rainfall is H.C. Hall of Wiggins and 6 Cooperative Extension Ser- expected to cause extended grandchildren, vice. periods of cold, damp Extensive rainfall in late w e a t h e r , s a y December and greater-than, agrometeorologists at the normal precipitation in Environmental Studies Januaury will probably Service Center in Stoneville. Mrs. Dan R. Moore, 70 of Wiggins died Dec. 29, 1978 at Forrest General Hospital. Her birthdate was May 29, 29, 1908, in Forrest County. She was a member of Ebenezer Baptist Church. She is survived by her husband, Mr. Dan R. Moore of Wiggins; one daughter, Mrs. Ruby Nell Rayburn of Wiggins; one son; Harland R. (Billy) Moore of Savannah, Ga.; three sisters; Mrs. Price Snowden, Gulfport; Mrs. Beatrice Clingon and Mrs. Betty Register, both of Hat- tiesburg; 6 grandchildren and 2 great-randchildren. Services were held Sunday, Dec. 31 at 3:30 p.m. at Moore Funeral Home Chapel with interment in Fairley Cemetery. Reverend elan Johnson officiated. Serving as pall bearers were Thomas E. Johnson, Everett L. Clingon, Garlan Moore, Ben C. Patrick, Ralph Moore, and Hugh Snowden. Mr. Thomas Edward Owens, 60, of Wiggins died Dec. 21, 1978 at Stone County Hospital. His birthdate was Sept. 26, 1918 at DeLo. Miss. and he was a carpenter. Serwces were held Satur- day, Dee. 23, at 3 p.m. at Moore Funeral Home Chapel with interment in Ten Mile Cemetery. Reverend Douglas Pitts officiated. Pallbearers were Raz Davis, Will Fiveash, Delmer Fiveasb, Terry Amacker, James L. Fulcher and Jeff Ladner. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Arlene Owens of Wiggins; two daughters; Mrs. Patsey Finnley of Atlanta, Ga., Tommy Lee Owens of Lucedale; one son, Douglas Owens of Bond: two sisters, Let's Not Indict Eggs ByEd Blake-Ag Affairs Innocent until proven guilty may be the hallmark of American justice, but time and again this standard is abandoned by modern society as alleged guilt causes a lot of innocent things to have to prove and reprove their in- nocence. Not since Haropty Dumpty sat on a great wall has the egg image been so fractured as it has been during recent years because some scientists feared the unknown and at- tributed a parallel between egg eating, cholesterol levels in the human body and a predisposition to a heart at- tack. Well ahead of Easter it would be well to clear the air a bit, so the millions of parents and grandparents who follow the little gang around the yard, salt shaker in hand to gorge on the dropped and broken Easter eggs, may participate in their annual excesses without undue traumatic concerns. Recently the National Commission on Egg Nutrition has brought forth some of the latest findings and beliefs concerning egRs and cholesterol - and the news is heat'tening, no pun intended. First let's look at the egg's c, itribution to human health. Eggs provide excellent protein containing the amino acids which the body needs but can't manufacture. Through egg eating we can borrow on fowl resources to the degree that a single egg supplies 10-15 percent of the recommended daily allowance for protein. Egg., also supply vitamins A, the E complex, D, E, and K as well as iron, copper, sulfur. magnesium, phosphorus, and choline. And, eggs are easily digestible, widely available, and relatively inexpensive as January" BEV'S BLAZE long trip. Suddenly he turned to his father and said; "I wish you'd let Mom drive - it's more exciting." Bumper Snicker. "Pay your taxes early. I need my relief check right away." Reverend and Mrs. N. J. Lee of Wiggins celebrated their 68th wedding an- niversary Monday, Jan. 8, 1979. The Ralph Burton's celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary in December. The Girl Scouts will be taking cookie orders. Jan. 12- 20. In the mail today Monday) I received several pieces of mail that had been sent Dec. 22. How's that for service! Special days in February. 2 -Ground Hog Day; 4 - 10 Boy Scout Week; 12 - Abraham Lincoln's birthday; 14 - St. Valentine's Day; 17 24 Future Farmers of America Week; 18 - 24 Brotherhood Week; 22 - George Washington's birthday; 26 - total eclipse of the sun; 28 - Ash Wednesday, Lent begins - ends Good Friday (April 13 - Easter is April 15.) Vic and I caught a bug about 6 weeks ago and it won't go away. Any remedies (aside from cutting our heads off) would be appreciated. We are tired of being sick. R was recently reported that inmates in New York City jails were receiving $270,000 a year worth of relief checks. According to Dacan Associates, Chicago food consultants, the typical Thanksgiving Day dinner this year exceeded 2,000 calories, compared with 575 calories consumed by the Pilgrims back in 1621. Humorist Mark Russell offers his definRion of in- flation; "When you pay cash, they ask to see your drive," ' lieense." Did you know that tomatoes are 93 percent water? Kenneth Snodderly of Key West, Fla. reported his $65 Gucci handbag stolen con- mining the following items: a matching Gucci wallet (value $30), a Tiffany lighter ($180), $50 in cash, a checkbook and worth of food stamps. In the first quarter of 1978, the national median price of a new house in the U.S. has gone over the f,50,000 ceiling to about $54,000. That's com- pared to a cost of $,000 for 1977. The new total is more than three times the median U.S. Family income. Sign ina travel agency. "Go Away." A small boy was bored on a a source of high quality protein. In recent years however, much comment on egg nutrition has been addressed to the cholesterol content of egg, with some suggesting that cholesterol may influence the development of coronary heart disease. The egg people, on good authority, say 'taint so. Here's why. Cholesterol is an essential substance in the human body, enabling your nerves to transmit impulses thru your body. Your nerve system would be like a tractor out of grease and oil if you didn't have an adequate supply of cholesterol. In short, you must have it or you die. However, this is not to say that cholesterol needed to sustain life must come from your diet. The body can manufacture your own. Tlere are two kinds of cholesterol. Dietary cholesterol is that which is cntained in foods of animal origin which we eat. Serum cholesterd is that which circulates in the blood stream attached to particles called lipoproteins. Today some scientists believe high levels of one form of lipoproteins protects against coronary heart disease while another type may be an indicator of increased risk of high disease. The great debafe among the eggheads is "what exactly is the relationship between dietary and cholesterol?" dosages of cholesterol certain animals has shown to raise cholesterol, with some results with hmmms. this cloudy area recent periments show that consumption of cholesterol through eggs not raised serum when added to otht balanced diets. Some of people involved in the added from one fresh eggs daffy to their diets for weeks and without significant change] their mean serum levels. : All of this is not to say to cholesterol in the that the effect of cholesterol on cholesterol is fully derstood. But what does it  thinking people, and to doctors and researchers, that it would appear to lie false premise to tie the egg! heart disease. The troversy is yet although the best tends to fail to indict eggs culprit as far as the heart concerned. And in no certain terms, eggs' tribution to nutritional is hard to know, even ff may not have cracked entire run of false regarding cholesterol. LIBERTY LINES- Free China WASHINGTON (Liberty Lobby Ne,as Service)--Jimmy Carter's betrayal of the Republic of Free China on Talc, an consummates a + 33-year .nsplrao,' by tile US. State Departrflerlt and inter: national financiers to insure a total commumst victor, in China and the destruction of the Nationalist t'hinese+ The U.S. Senate un- covered the conspiracy 2b years ago For tbose of you not old enough to remember, t-he years 1048-19.54 erc a time of great public re- act|on against communist sub- crsion in the U.S. in the ake of the Alger Hiss spy case and the Julius and Ethel Rosenberg atomic secrets sp> case. as ,,ell as others too numerous to mention. the people rose up and demanded action. One result vas that the U.S. Senalc conducted a special investigation into hy China fell to the communists. The ehairm=n of the investigative committee was tbe late Sen. Pat McCarran tD-Nex.} and a majority of the committee members were Demo- crals. Neserthetess. when the commit- tec concluded its year-long in- quir.v, it reported that a wide- ranging conspiracy, reaching into tbe highest levels of the State Department and the White House. involving American communists and Soviet agents, ,,,.'as respon- sible for the communist victory in China. The committee reported that a small group of communists had. since 1945. directed and manip- ulated American policy in China to insure that the communist forces led by the late Mao Tse.tung v, outd triumph. If you can remember those years, see hat these names mean tO VOU: Owen Lattimore. The Commit- tee concluded that he had been a conscious, articulate instrument of the Soviet conspiracy since the 1930's. Yet, Lattimore was a adviser to President Truman America's China policy. John Stewart Servie? Thb State Deoa'rt ment: regarding China wa cspionage in 1945. it took eight years to get around canning him. and he had his back  ithin three years. The resuh of these and other revelations as Ihat the China lobby was driven ground fi,r a flew years. publicl> re-surfaced in the It,0"s. especially in the .Iohn,,on Administration. Significantly. the first State Department spokesml/t the Iq60"s to engineer a of Taian tas Robcrt an associate of Lattimore ftmd 1940"s. The McCarran discovered that Bennett was pro-commun,it as well. Ima >ears after their report. was Mill in the State more influential than ever i As tile l=rem:h sty, "The things change, the more the same." Apd if things do the same. or get worse, it because the same people behind it all: the R-kefelle. I'he Rockefellers wcrc g, oup called the Institute Policy Studies in the Iq44Ts. v, as the nmjor, recruiting for the communist agents orchestrated the fall of Chilm. Today the Rockefellers ulate policy thnmgh tl,dr lateral Commission, Irhal no coincidence, then. that the" Chinese gave Cot:a-Cola a poly in their count'. The man of Coca-Cola is J. Austin, a member of the feller Trilateral The Chinese know who run in Ameriea... even if you don't' Aw., S.g.. W*M D.C- #.++.rl, r., I- #I,-i0/M0.+Io+, .#t, ,. OFFICIAL ORGAN OF STONE MEMBER Nat/onal Newsll ASNetSM PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY, STONE COUNTY Izrrmmm me. P.O. Box WZGGmS, ibiS. EDITOR& PUBLISIIER BEVERLY R. YINGLING ,  L "A LEADER IN COMMUNITY ENTERED WEEKLY AS SECOND CLAim JULY 3, 19115 AT 'lille  OFFICE IN WlII] UNDER ACT OF CONGRE - MARCH 1 1171. 1 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION STONE COUNTY & SERVICE PERS0NNL ELSEWHERE IN MISSII]p OUT OF STATE 'REEDOM OF THE PRESS - Freedom of file guarded as a vital right of mlnkird. R is right to discuss whatever is not expllcltly hiliii Iff cludin. g,me wlada of may  []